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New Documents Posted for September

Industry Documents Library - Fri, 2016-09-02 09:08

Greetings!


934 new documents were added to the Truth Tobacco Industry Documents yesterday.



This includes:

  • 815 RJR documents
  • 30 Philip Morris documents
  • 89 Depositions and Trial Testimony (DATTA) documents


  • Happy Labor Day!

Cigarette brand promotional events frequently encourage alcohol...







Cigarette brand promotional events frequently encourage alcohol use. Why? Because it has been shown that linking cigarettes with alcohol reinforces the use of both substances and makes it harder to quit smoking…

In the mid 1980′s, RJ Reynolds wanted to position Camel as “THE younger adult brand” and “reinforce the target prospect’s psychological desire to attain an image of being independent, adventurous and masculine”.  The marketing campaign above pitches a certain masculine lifestyle coupled with alcohol as a way to get young adults to buy Camel.  The promotional events involve “skill, dexterity, strength and other masculine qualities” such as T-Shirt contests (men and women); Beer Chug contests; Special drink promotions; video game competitions; decathlons involving beer and beach towels; six-pack ring pull; etc.

Read the entire document at the UCSF Industry Documents Library:

OBJECTIVES OF CAMEL FIELD MARKETING PROMOTIONS.
URL : https://www.industrydocumentslibrary.ucsf.edu/tobacco/docs/xhdh0083
Author : Unknown
Document Date : 1984 November 29

Ortho-Fusor for Modern Visual Training

Brought to Light Blog - Mon, 2016-08-29 08:28

We’ve been cataloging additions to our Historical Medical Artifact Collection recently. It’s always fun diving into the over 1,000 objects in the collection. This treasure is the Ortho-Fusor, a Bausch & Lomb product for “Modern Visual Training.”

Ortho-Fusor, 1941. Artifact Collection, item 1157.

The Ortho-Fusor, dated 1941, includes Polaroid 3D glasses, a reference manual, and a spiral-bound booklet with vectograph images and exercises. A vectograph is a type of stereoscopic image composed of two superimposed, polarized pictures that produce a 3D effect when viewed through polarizing spectacles. Think of it like going to a 3D movie, except you are viewing stills.

Ortho-Fusor booklet, 1941. Artifact Collection, item 1157.

Ortho-Fusor booklet, 1941. Artifact Collection, item 1157.

The Ortho-Fusor exercises, which involve refocusing your eyes on various points in the image, were designed for “re-educating and training visual skills” for the “modern need.”  As noted in the reference manual, “the world of modern occupations has drawn many more thousands of us into factories, offices, libraries, schools, shops, and laboratories. Here for hours at a time we perform sustained and precise tasks with our eyes, frequently at very close distances…The precise teamwork of the eyes is a matter of coordination and habit.” The reference manual encourages 30 minutes of use a day, in five to ten minute intervals.

Ortho-Fusor Reference Manual, 1941. Artifact Collection, item 1157.

Ophthalmologists and optometrists, let us know what you think of these visual exercises and the Ortho-Fusor’s medical claims!

Categories: Brought to Light

The RICO case turns 10 today

Industry Documents Library - Wed, 2016-08-17 10:05

Today marks the 10th anniversary of the historic racketeering (RICO) case against Big Tobacco, United States of America, et al. v Philip Morris USA, Inc., et al. On Aug. 17, 2006, U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler issued her final opinion, in which Philip Morris, RJ Reynolds, BATCo, American Tobacco, Lorillard, and Brown & Williamson were all found guilty of defrauding the American people by lying for decades about the health risks of smoking, manipulating nicotine content in cigarettes, and marketing to children.

The opinion weighs in at 1683 pages, and while we encourage you to settle down and read it in its fascinating entirety, the following excerpt sums it up perfectly:

“The seven-year history of this extraordinarily complex case involved the exchange of millions of documents, the entry of more than 1,000 Orders, and a trial which lasted approximately nine months with 84 witnesses testifying in open court. Those statistics, and the mountains of paper and millions of dollars of billable lawyer hours they reflect, should not, however, obscure what this case is really about. It is about an industry, and in particular these Defendants, that survives, and profits, from selling a highly addictive product which causes diseases that lead to a staggering number of deaths per year, an immeasurable amount of human suffering and economic loss, and a
profound burden on our national health care system. Defendants have known many of these facts for at least 50 years or more. Despite that knowledge, they have consistently, repeatedly, and with
enormous skill and sophistication, denied these facts to the public, to the Government, and to the public health community. Moreover, in order to sustain the economic viability of their companies, Defendants have denied that they marketed and advertised their products to children under the age of eighteen and to young people between the ages of eighteen and twenty-one in order to ensure an adequate supply of “replacement smokers,” as older ones fall by the wayside through death, illness, or cessation of smoking. In short, Defendants have marketed and sold their lethal product with zeal, with deception, with a single-minded focus on their financial success, and without regard for the
human tragedy or social costs that success exacted.”

Kessler, Final Opinion, pages 33-34

Besides imposing remedies upon the tobacco companies that included banning the use of terms such as “low tar,” “light,” “ultra light,” “mild,” and “natural”, which had been used to mislead consumers about the health risks of smoking particular cigarette brands, Kessler’s Final Judgment and Order (shorter, at a mere 18 pages) extended the length of time the tobacco companies must publish on their websites their internal company documents produced in litigation. Those documents are housed permanently in UCSF Library’s Truth Tobacco Industry Documents Archive. To celebrate the anniversary, pay us a visit and browse some tobacco industry documents.

You can download zip files of the final judgment and order, final opinion, and other court documents from TTID’s “Lawsuits and Court Documents” webpage (scroll down to US v. Philip Morris, et al.)

Happy reading, and happy anniversary!

Tips for Creating a Multimedia Project

Convergence - Wed, 2016-08-17 07:45

Have you ever had a great idea for creating a multimedia project, but didn’t know where to get started? No need to worry, the Learning Tech Group’s got you covered! Here are some tips for how to go about planning and creating an effective project while using the Library Tech Commons resources.

Develop a plan
Before you begin your project, you’ll need to come up with a plan. Start by defining your goals for the project, the message you would like to convey, and remember to keep your audience in mind.

Consider how you will deliver the project and choose the media that best coveys your message.  If you’re not so sure which media to use, schedule an appointment with the Learning Tech Group to get some guidance during this step. Once you decide which media you will use, then determine the necessary skills and resources needed to complete the project, and how much time will be involved.

Use the Tech Commons Resources
The Tech Commons offers audio and video equipment and workstations equipped with an assortment of multimedia editing applications. Learn more about how you can use these resources to create your projects below:

Production Resources
The Equipment for Loan Program offers a comprehensive collection of video and audio equipment for a variety of media production needs. This is a free service available to UCSF students, staff, and faculty only. Our equipment is used ever day for a variety of projects, including interviews, medical demonstrations, and even student skits. A full list of our offerings is available on our Support Center website.

Multimedia Workstations
Tech Commons’ Multimedia Workstations are available on the 2nd floor of the UCSF Library (CL-240) and in the eLearning Studio (CL-245). In addition to standard web and productivity software, the multimedia workstations include a wide range of multimedia editing applications. A complete list of software/hardware available is available on our Support Center Website.

eLearning Studio
If you are looking for a quiet place to record and build learning modules, check out the eLearning Studio (CL-245) in the UCSF Tech Commons. This room is appropriate for projects that cannot be completed using public workstations, such as recording narration, working with protected health information, or collaborating with a group on a video or audio project. The eLearning Studio is in high demand so reserve it in advance and read more about it on the Convergence blog.

Help and Support
Learning Tech Specialists are available to help guide you through the process of creating multimedia projects. We can help you find the right tool for the job, teach you how to use that tool, and support you until the project is complete. Register for a Tech Clinic or make an appointment with us to get some guidance on your project!

Helpful Links
UCSF’s Digital Asset Database includes logos, photographs, illustrations, video and documents that can be used by the UCSF community.

UCSF’s Brand Identity site has information on how to communicate UCSF’s brand consistently and has a variety of templates in Microsoft Word and PowerPoint available for download.

UCSF Digital Accessibility offers information about UCSF’s accessibility policy. This site also has resources for making online content available to all and removing barriers that prevent access to websites by people with disabilities.

Copyright at UCSF is an online guide that provides information on copyright, publishing, and intellectual property.

Do you have a multimedia project in mind and have questions about how to get started? Attend a Tech Clinic at the UCSF Library, contact a Learning Tech Specialist, or leave a comment below!

 

Categories: Convergence

New to RefWorks? Already using it? Upgrade to the new RefWorks

In Plain Sight - Mon, 2016-08-15 14:23

Reference managers like RefWorks, do three things, they store information about articles, organize that information, and then add citation and reference information to documents you create. The new version of RefWorks is a major improvement over the old one on all fronts.

Modernized interface, easy import to your library, better PDF handling and now compatible with Microsoft Word 2016 and Google Docs, the new blue-themed RefWorks is available for your use. The red-themed “legacy” RefWorks will be phased out in another year. Note: The new RefWorks only works with Word and GoogleDocs. The folks at RefWorks suggests you delay upgrading until you have completed any current projects.

The process of moving from old to new version is surprisingly easy as a I discovered recently. The whole process took about 10 minutes. You can keep both versions of RefWorks after you have upgraded until ProQuest stops support of the legacy version in September, 2017.

The upgrade steps are:

  1. Go to https://refworks.proquest.com/
  2. Click Create Account (see right)
  3. They will ask for you email, use your UCSF email.
  4. They will ask if you want to migrate your legacy RefWorks library into the new RefWorks. Say yes! This process takes less than 10 minutes (this step does not apply to new RefWorks users).
  5. You will need to install the new version of the plug-in for Word (there is one for 2016 and another for earlier  versions of Word).
  6. You will need to install the bookmarklet that works with your browser and helps you import new articles to RefWorks.

For numbers 5 and 6 from above, find Tools in the “three vertical dots” men. See above.

  1. Add Install Save to RefWorks, this helps you add information to your RefWorks library. You drag and drop this bookmarklet into your browser’s bookmarks toolbar.

  2. Install the plugin for your writing software. Notice the choices: Write-N-Cite for older versions of Word, Refworks Citation Manager for Word 2016, and the plug-in for GoogleDocs. This involves a download, installation, and then checking in Word to make sure it is working.

That’s it for installation. The next installment will talk about adding materials and organizing them in your RefWorks Library.

Please send me questions or comments.

–Whit

Categories: In Plain Sight

RefWorks Now Supports Word 2016

In Plain Sight - Tue, 2016-08-09 15:15

UCSF Library provides access to the reference manager RefWorks for the UCSF community.  Many rely on RefWorks, rather than EndNote, Zotero, Mendeley or others, to store and organize information, and cite references in  their documents. Microsoft Word is the primary word processor which works with the better-known reference managers.

old to new RefWorks

Microsoft Office 2016 came out in the summer-to-fall of 2015 for both Mac and Windows. Since that time those using RefWorks have faced a problem. If they unknowingly updated  to Office 2016 or bought a shiny new computer with Office 2016 installed they were not able to use RefWorks to format in-text citations and reference lists in Word documents. Either they needed to revert to the previous version of Office or change reference managers.

This problem is finally solved! RefWorks now has an update which works with Word 2016. The new plug-in is accessed through Word 2016.

There is more to the story. I will briefly summarize here. Proquest, the new parent company of RefWorks, is in the middle of upgrading from what is now called legacy RefWorks to ProQuest RefWorks. UCSF has not forced users to upgrade to the new version yet, but the legacy version will go away in September, 2017.

There will be more blog posts about RefWorks coming soon.

Let me know questions or if you are finding problems with the installation.

–Whit

Categories: In Plain Sight

CLE Help for Students

Convergence - Fri, 2016-07-29 11:13

In preparation for the Fall 2016 quarter at UCSF, the Learning Tech Group has been busy developing CLE support resources for new and returning students. Below is a short video covering frequently asked questions from students, as well as links to support documents designed to set students up for success in the UCSF CLE.

Are you a faculty member or support staff for a course that uses the CLE? Feel free to add links to these resources in your CLE courses or email this blog post to students. As always, contact us with any questions or feedback, or just leave a comment below. We’d love to know what you think, or if there are other topics you think we should cover.

CLE FAQ Video for Students

CLE Student Help Docs

Good luck this quarter from the Learning Tech Group!

Categories: Convergence

Just Send Me a Signal: Encrypted Communication, Whether or Not You’re a Spy

Mobilized - Thu, 2015-04-16 15:15

How worried should I be about my privacy?  While this question is not yet keeping me up at night, it’s been on my mind more in the past year than ever before. Privacy online, over email, and in a social media context is one thing, but what about the privacy of my personal communications say over the phone or via text message? Considering how startled I am when I actually get a phone call shows how little I use the phone to talk to anyone anymore. I’m more concerned about privacy over text messaging. This led me to explore what I can do to protect the privacy of my messaging on mobile devices, specifically my iPhone. I heard about an open source app called Signal offered by Open Whisper Systems and decided to check it out.

Why is it important?

There are a lot of ways to think about privacy in 2015. Ever since Edward Snowden, former contractor to the U.S. National Security Agency, leaked documents which revealed global surveillance programs run by the NSA, it’s been hard not to wonder about potential impact on our daily lives. If nothing else, Snowden triggered a tide of growing public awareness regarding the extent to which mass surveillance (and secrecy about surveillance) is de facto. How do we balance national security against information privacy?

I’m not a spy. I’m not engaged in illegal or illicit activity. Nor am I generally a paranoid person. My use of messaging is pretty average, nothing anyone would be surprised by, so why should I care if the government is listening?

This is precisely the mindset Glenn Greenwald seeks to challenge, this idea that even people who are uncomfortable with mass surveillance believe there’s no harm in it for them because they’re not doing anything wrong, not doing anything they need to hide. Only people engaged in bad acts have a reason to hide. Right? Privacy is no longer even a “social norm,” according to Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook.

The trouble is, “when somebody knows that they might be watched, the behavior they engage in is vastly more conformist and compliant… people, when they’re in a state of being watched, make decisions not that are the byproduct of their own agency but that are about the expectations that others have of them or the mandates of societal orthodoxy.”

transcript link

If we assume we’re being watched, whether or not we care, a good case can be made that this is the ultimate in societal control. “Mass surveillance creates a prison in the mind.” That’s no way to live as individuals, or as citizens. What freedoms—even just of the mind—are being eroded gradually, perniciously, in our day-to-day use of technology, and what are the costs (now and in the future)? I find these questions seriously interesting to consider.

As Greenwald says, we all need “to go somewhere where we can think and reason and interact and speak without the judgmental eyes of others being cast upon us.”

If you decide you’re willing to render yourself harmless, “sufficiently unthreatening to those who wield political power, then and only then can you be free of the dangers of surveillance. ”

Okay, so let’s see what Signal is about.

Why choose Signal?

Signal started out as an encrypted calling app for iPhones and iPads. The new version, Signal 2.0, adds encrypted text messages using a protocol called TextSecure. Users can communicate via voice or text securely because Signal employs end-to-end encryption. The goal is for Signal to be “a unified private voice and text communication platform for iPhone, Android, and the browser.”

One persuasive argument for its use is that the code is open source. The Intercept makes the additional argument of consistency, particularly for iPhone users:

Signal is also one special place on the iPhone where users can be confident all their communications are always fully scrambled. Other apps with encryption tend to enter insecure modes at unpredictable times — unpredictable for many users, at least. Apple’s iMessage, for example, employs strong encryption, but only when communicating between two Apple devices and only when there is a proper data connection. Otherwise, iMessage falls back on insecure SMS messaging. iMessage also lacks forward secrecy and inspect-able source code.

After testing it for a couple of weeks with several contacts, I can say it works fairly well. It’s slightly glitchy, more basic (with fewer features) and not as elegant as iMessage. Not bad, but not awesome, which I’ll get back to at the end. First, a few observations.

Once you download Signal and allow it access to your contacts you can start messaging with someone who has Signal, but here’s the rub: they have to find you, you can’t locate them.

Notifications do not reveal who sent you a message and so you have to open the app to find out.

You have to turn sound on in your iPhone’s Settings in order for Signal to work. If you turn sound off, you’ll get an error message.

There is often a very slight delay in sending a message, and a longer delay when sending an attachment. Frequently the delay is so long the error message “Attachment is downloading” displays.

[oh, and the attachment which took so long to download? Not a dick pic.]

Ahem. Otherwise, the process for taking pics, accessing the camera roll and attaching is quite similar to iMessage.

If you want to message with more than one person at a time, you have to name the group. I created one called “ladiez” for a group including myself and my friends Michele and Kimberly.

The in-app calling feature doesn’t work, and I can’t figure out why. Each time, I get a screen that displays “Connecting…” but the phone just continues to ring.

You can download the Signal app and start using it from anywhere, say for example a sailboat in the middle of the Caribbean.

To Signal or not to Signal?

I think my answer is Not, for now, though it was a fun experiment and I’ll keep the app on my iPhone. Maybe I’ll use it occasionally for more uh…sensitive content. There was definitely something sneaky feeling about it, which I kind of enjoyed, as did those I enlisted to help test it out. I can say it does make me feel more secure—and yeah, potentially more daring—to know Signal and a growing number of other tools for encryption are out there. To know people are doing something about the various ways in which our privacy is at risk.

Links for further exploration
  1. Encryption Works: How to Protect Your Privacy in the Age of NSA Surveillance
  2. The Great Sim Heist: How Spies Stole The Keys To The Encryption Castle
  3. As crypto wars begin, FBI silently removes sensible advice to encrypt your devices
  4. As encryption spreads, U.S. grapples with clash between privacy, security
  5. Stop Taking Dick Pics, But Not Because of the NSA (SFW)
Categories: Mobilized

TimelineJS: A Superb Open Source Tool

Mobilized - Mon, 2015-03-02 15:13
What is it?

TimelineJS is a web-based tool that allows you to easily create visually-rich, interactive timelines generated by your data. It’s an open source tool from Knight Lab at Northwestern University and is free to use — all you need is your content and a Google Drive spreadsheet.

How it works

Just download the spreadsheet template from the TimelineJS website, input your text, images, and links, then upload it to your Google Drive account. Next, publish your spreadsheet in Google Drive according to TimelineJS directions, then return to the TimelineJS website to paste your Google sheet link and view the result. You can share the link or embed your timeline on your own website.

//

My timeline Same Sex Marriages in the United States and When They Took Effect uses the TimelineJS default settings for visual effects and themes, and I think those produce a clean, professional appearance. However, you can alter visual effects and themes to your satisfaction. You can also edit and update your data within the Google spreadsheet at any time, and the changes will automatically appear in your timeline. For instance, I’ve had to update marriage equality information for a number of new states!

Where it excels
  • TimelineJS scores big for ease of use. This spreadsheet method makes Timeline JS much simpler and faster to work with than other timeline tools that default to creating the timeline slide by slide and element by element.
  • It also really shines in its ability to display your timeline responsively. Check out a timeline on your phone. It adapts and looks good on both large and small screens, though I would recommend doing timeline creation on a large screen due to the complexities of inputting information.
Tips
  • There are no options for creating an account, so it’s important to keep track of links to timelines that you construct.
  • Each slide must have something entered in the Start Date column in order to display. Don’t alter the headings or delete columns from the spreadsheet template or the TimelineJS generator won’t work.
  • If your website runs on WordPress, you may need to use this plugin and your Google spreadsheet URL instead of the standard <iframe> embed code.
Who is it for?

TimelineJS is a flexible tool that can enhance many topics and areas of study. Most users will simply gather materials for the story they want to tell and enter them into the spreadsheet template. Those who have JSON skills can go further and create custom installations.

Timelines are an excellent way to visually convey transition and change within sciences or social movements, and there are lots of possibilities for teaching and learning. These can extend beyond simply the instructor presenting content to requiring class participation in gathering and describing the data. Since creation and editing of this timeline tool is done in a shareable Google spreadsheet, direct collaboration is possible. Students could also select and construct topics and histories individually or in group projects.

More examples

Be sure to look through some other examples for inspiration and ideas for your own timelines.

Categories: Mobilized
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