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Archival Outlook

Brought to Light Blog - Mon, 2015-02-02 13:02

Have you seen the November/December 2014 issue of Archival Outlook?

Archival Outlook, November/December 2014

The cover photo comes from our Photograph Collection! Remember when we told you about our new Twitter account, @ucsf_archives, and how we’d be participating in #AskAnArchivist Day last October? Well, the photo on the cover is one that we tweeted out in response to a question about our favorite collection items and it caught the eye of the folks over at the Society of American Archivists.

Posing with cadavers was commonplace in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Dissecting medical school cadavers was an intimate rite of passage for students. Such photographs weren’t viewed as inappropriate or offensive, as they most certainly would be today, but more as a kind of memorial to the experience. For more information on the ritual, check out Dissection: Photographs of a Rite of Passage in American Medicine 1880-1930.

Notice the writing on the blackboard says “University of California Medical Center, Jan-7-96.” It was taken at the Toland Medical Building on Stockton Street in San Francisco, pictured below, in 1896.

Toland Medical Building, 1882-1885

 

The first-ever #AsAnArchivist Day was a great success, garnering over 2,000 participants who contributed more than 6,000 tweets. We had a lot of fun participating with curious patrons and other institutions. Follow us on twitter if you aren’t already and feel free to ask a question anytime!

Archival Outlook is published six times a year by the Society of American Archivists (SAA) which serves the education and information needs of its members and provides leadership to help ensure the identification, preservation, and use of the nation’s historical record.

Categories: Brought to Light

Having Problems with RefWorks’ Write-n-Cite?

In Plain Sight - Mon, 2015-02-02 12:16

UCSF librarians have encountered several Mac RefWorks users having problems getting Write-n-Cite to work correctly on their laptops. Usually it’s associated with the Mavericks and Yosemite operating systems. These problems are often not reproducible, so it’s been difficult to pin down why it’s not working properly and what’s the fix.

If you’re a RefWorks user having problems using Write-n-Cite you can still format a bibliography using One-Line/Cite. View this short online tutorial to see how this method works:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternatively, you may want to switch to different software. Some of our students are switching to Zotero, which is free and relatively easy to learn.

Click here to learn more about Zotero.

Categories: In Plain Sight

UCSF Archives Lecture: The Forgotten Epidemic: HIV/AIDS in Women and Children

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2015-01-27 11:35

Join us on Thursday, February 26th as Arthur Ammann, M.D., gives a lecture in a series launched by UCSF Archives & Special Collections.

Date: Thursday, February 26th, 2015
Time: 4 pm-5:20 pm
Location: Lange Room, UCSF Library, 530 Parnassus, 5th floor
This lecture is free and open to the public. Light refreshments provided.
Please RSVP to reserve a seat

Collage of lab data on first patients in 1981, MMWR report and 1982 San Francisco Chronicle article on first blood transfusion AIDS

Beginning in 1981 researchers at UCSF defined some of the most important features of the emerging AIDS epidemic – the cause of AIDS, the clinical features of AIDS, populations at risk for HIV infection, methods to prevent and treat HIV, and discovery of HIV. Working closely with community activists, advocates, scientists and policy makers, UCSF distinguished itself as a model of successful collaboration. The first discovery of AIDS in infants and children and blood transfusion associated AIDS at UCSF were instrumental in defining the extent of the epidemic. The scientific advances in HIV/AIDS that occurred over the next two decades were remarkable resulting in the near eradication of HIV in infants in the US and transforming an acute and fatal infection in adults to a chronic and manageable one. But even as these advances occurred benefiting many millions of people worldwide, women and children were too often excluded, resulting in a global epidemic that is now composed of over 50% women and children and a secondary epidemic of AIDS-related orphans that numbers in the tens of millions.

Arthur J. Ammann, M.D.

Arthur J. Ammann, M.D., is a founder of Global Strategies, a nonprofit organization that serves women and children in the most neglected areas of the world and Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at UCSF.
From 1971 to 1985, Dr. Ammann was Director of Pediatric Immunology and Clinical Research Center at the UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco. In 1977, Dr. Ammann’s clinical trials of a pneumococcal vaccine resulted in the first FDA approval of a vaccine for bacterial pneumonia and meningitis in children and adults. In 1982 Dr. Ammann described two of the three ways that HIV is transmitted including the first cases of transmission of AIDS from mother to infant and the first blood transfusion associated AIDS patients.
Dr. Ammann has received honors from more than 60 national and international organizations including the United States Surgeon General Award for Research and Heroes in Medicine Award by the International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care.
Dr. Ammann has authored over 300 scientific papers which have appeared in major medical journals. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Wheaton College (1958) and a doctor of medicine degree from New Jersey College of Medicine (1962).  He received residency training from the department of pediatrics at UCSF and fellowship training in immunology from the University of Minnesota Medical Center and the University of Wisconsin Medical Center.
Dr. Ammann’s oral history,“Pediatric AIDS Immunologist: Advocate for the Children” is accessible online and at the UCSF Library.

About the UCSF Archives & Special Collections Lecture Series
UCSF Archives & Special Collections launched this lecture series to introduce a wider community to treasures and collections from its holdings, to provide an opportunity for researchers to discuss how they use this material, and to celebrate clinicians, scientists, and health care professionals who donated their papers to the archives.

Categories: Brought to Light

2015 Tech Clinics at UCSF Library

Convergence - Wed, 2015-01-21 15:46

The Learning Technologies Group had a great time with the 2014 Tech Clinics and we were able to help with CLE and multimedia projects along the way! Here are a few examples of UCSF projects that faculty and staff brought to the Tech Clinics: CLE gradebook questions, Articulate module development, Media@UCSF integration in CLE courses, online exam review for finals and midterms, and we even helped support a UCSF podcast!

2015 is going to be even better and you can register for an upcoming Tech Clinic today! Tech Clinics are held at the UCSF Library, every second and forth Friday of the month, from 9am-4pm. We encourage people to register in advance, but drop-ins are welcome. Each Clinic offers short presentations and demos on popular topics throughout the day, as well as one-on-one support opportunities with Learning Technologies staff.

Here is what people are saying about the Tech Clinics:

The Tech Clinic is a valuable, convenient, and wonderful resource. All my tech questions were answered and I received a follow-up email with additional resources to help me with my project. I appreciate the knowledge of the staff and how quick we were able to cover things. I look forward to using the service again in the future and will refer others to this great service.”

– Robert Kirkbride | Event Production | Campus Life Services, Arts & Events

2015 Tech Clinic Topics include:
  • CLE Basics: This 90 minute training is offered on-demand at the start of every Tech Clinic. Have new staff or faculty using the CLE? This is the perfect opportunity to get them started on the right foot!
  • Integrate video in a CLE Course: Learn about new ways to incorporate video in your CLE course, including adding media assignments, creating Media Galleries, and using the screen recorder. Click to Register Now!
  • Get to know the Storyline Suite: We are thrilled to have Articulate Storyline available in the Tech Commons. Come see a demo of this powerful software and start your next UCSF project! Click to Register Now!
  • Online Exam and Gradebook: Have questions about CLE exams before, during, or after the semester? Need to fix a grading issue? The Tech Clinic is the place to get your questions answered! Click to Register Now!
  • CLE Course Design Tips: The CLE has changed (for the better)! Learn how to get the most out of these improvements and design courses for students using mobile devices. Click to Register Now!
  • Screencasting with Camtasia: Need to demonstrate how to use an application or website? Camtasia is a screencasting software used and supported in the Tech Commons’ eLearning Studio (CL-245). Camtasia is system agnostic (available on both the Mac and PC platforms).

2015 UCSF Library’s Tech Clinic Schedule (click the link for more information and to register):

Just a few reminders from last year’s Clinics:
  • Too busy to make it the UCSF Parnassus Library for a Clinic? Attend remotely using WebEx
  • Attend a CLE Roundtable to collaborate with other faculty and staff using the CLE (held from 12-1pm during every Clinic)
  • Film a faculty interview in the eLearning Studio during a Tech Clinic
  • Learn a new application using Lynda.com in the Tech Commons
  • Repeat! Return for another Clinic for follow-up questions and best practices for next semester

Have questions about the UCSF Library’s Tech Clinics? Contact the Learning Technologies Group today!

Image Credit:

Kemi Amin from the UCSF Library

Categories: Convergence

Lecture now online: Karl F. Meyer: California’s Forgotten Microbe Hunter

Brought to Light Blog - Wed, 2015-01-21 09:45

The lecture Karl F. Meyer: California’s Forgotten Microbe Hunter given by Mark Honigsbaum, PhD at UCSF last month, on December 5th, is now available free online via the Internet Archive.

 

In the 1930s California’s rapid population growth and the incursion of agricultural settlers into valleys and deserts teeming with exotic pathogens resulted in outbreaks of “new” infectious diseases. To divine the cause of these outbreaks and trace the epidemics to their source, health officials turned to San Francisco’s premier “microbe hunter,” Karl Friedrich Meyer.

Drawing on Meyer’s papers at the UCSF and Bancroft libraries, this talk reviews Meyer’s feats of microbial detection and his pioneering investigations of disease ecology. Dr. Honigsbaum views Meyer as an important bridge figure in mid-20th century medical research who sought to link microbial behavior to broader environmental and social factors that impact host-pathogen interactions and the mechanisms of disease control.

 

About the UCSF Archives & Special Collections Lecture Series: This lecture series was launched to introduce a wider community to treasures and collections from its holdings, to provide an opportunity for researchers to discuss how they use this material and to celebrate clinicians, scientists, and health care professionals who donated their papers to the archives.

Find out more about upcoming lectures, past presentations, and links to more lecture videos here! And please, join us for the next one– coming soon in 2015!

Categories: Brought to Light

Subscribers to Nature Journals Can Now Use ReadCube to Annotate Research Articles

In Plain Sight - Thu, 2015-01-15 15:58

 

 

Subscribers to Nature.com journals can now use ReadCube to highlight and annotate research articles in their web browser. Nature Publishing Group (NPG) and Digital Science have announced the integration of ReadCube’s web reader tool with nature.com. The web reader tool is currently available to personal subscribers and site license users. 18 Nature journals are currently available.

ReadCube is a free desktop and browser-based program for managing, annotating, and accessing academic research articles. It provides access to research materials through partnerships with several publishing companies. ReadCube’s SmartCite allows you to create a bibliography while you write using the contents of your ReadCube Library and any article available on PubMed.

More information about ReadCube.

ReadCube also allows users to enhance PDF  files with both the browser-based and desktop application. Once enhanced, articles have interactive citations, integrated authorial information, and access to stored supplements. Additionally, users can highlight sections of documents and write notes saved within the client.

Press release from Nature.com about ReadCube: including Journal Titles.

Categories: In Plain Sight

Preserving MRI Developments at UCSF

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2015-01-13 09:42

For the next year, I’ll be processing the records of the Radiologic Imaging Laboratory (RIL), 1969-2000. This laboratory pioneered advancements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and helped develop technology that’s now used in hospitals and clinics throughout the world. The collection showcases bioengineering in action and highlights the relationships among industry, research, and education at UCSF.

In process boxes from the RIL records.

RIL founder and electrical engineer Lawrence E. Crooks gifted the collection to the archives in the early 2000s. It includes over 80 cartons of material ranging from lab notebooks with early scan images to patient records and marketing presentations.

Lawrence Crooks lab notebook, 1979-1983. From the RIL records, MSS 2002-08

The material traces the RIL’s growth through different funding agencies and corporate affiliations, including Pfizer, Diasonics, and Toshiba. There are even some personal items, like photographs of lab members celebrating Mardi Gras during a conference in New Orleans!

In process marketing slides from the RIL records. The collection includes slides, Polaroids of scan images, negatives, and photographs.

Currently, the collection is cataloged (MSS 2002-08) and has a preliminary inventory, though much of the material lacks intellectual control. My goals are to complete the collection’s processing, create a detailed online finding aid, and digitize a large portion of the material. I will also help curate an exhibit at the UCSF library and a companion online exhibit.

In process tapes from the RIL records. The collection includes tapes, floppy disks, and videotapes.

I’m really excited about the project and hope that it will help users better access the material. The collection is rich in research potential and I can’t wait to see the unique projects it inspires.

Categories: Brought to Light

Accessions & Additions

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2015-01-06 10:38

We’re always busy accepting new collections and pushing through our backlog to make as many collections available for research as possible. This long list of new catalog records includes materials relating to tobacco control, UCSF, neurology, nursing education, HIV/AIDS organizations, pharmacy, medical librarianship, pediatric diabetes, and more. Click on the titles below to learn more the contents, subjects, and size of these collections.

Contact us if you have any questions or would like to learn more. And please don’t hesitate to use the calendar on the right to make an appointment to come in and use the collections!

Our catalog updates over the past six months:

Categories: Brought to Light

Using RefWorks to Manage Your PDF Collection

In Plain Sight - Mon, 2015-01-05 15:24

RefWorks is a popular easy-to-use citation management application but has limited options for working with PDFs. At the moment it is not possible to directly import PDFs into a folder. However, in the edit view you can upload the PDF as a file attachment:

 

 

 

 

The text of PDFs and other file attachments may be searched by selecting Attachments in the Advanced Search/Search Field drop-down menu and entering a search term.

Note that in addition to PDFs a file attachment can be a Word document, an image file or  other file types.

For more information on file attachments view this Attachment Feature Fact document.

 

Categories: In Plain Sight

LTG’s Successes of the Year: 2014 Edition

Convergence - Tue, 2014-12-23 11:30

The winter solstice just passed marking the onset of winter and it’s the perfect time to reflect on the year. Looking back on 2014, we in the Learning Technologies Group have many successes to be proud of. We’ve gathered some of our top accomplishments from the past year. Take a look at the below list and leave a comment to let us know what you think!

We transformed our workshops!

This year, LTG launched our new, more user-friendly approach to workshops called Tech Clinics. Clinics give our customers the opportunity to get help with whatever you need at any time during the Clinic. Liz Taylor introduced a new CLE Basics workshop and all together, we had more than 110 attendees to our Clinics in 2014. Don’t forget, if you need more assistance when we’re not available, check out our new Lynda.com kiosk now available in Tech Commons complete with Moodle and other ed tech tutorials.

The CLE got a makeover!

The LTG partnered with the Library’s systems admin team to roll out a new version of Moodle to power the CLE. The update included new features and a responsive, mobile friendly theme. Along with the refresh, we rallied for installing the Attendance plug-in on the CLE.

We participated in a Moodle Moot!

LTG staff member Dylan Romero ventured to Montana to attend the 2014 Moodle Mountain Moot. This was an incredible opportunity to collaborate with other “Moodlers” on topics ranging from user documentation to quiz security. Dylan also had the opportunity to chat with Moodle Man himself about the opportunities and challenges of online learning!

We were out and about throughout UCSF campuses!

LTG extended our presence and gained exposure throughout UCSF through the following venues:

  • This past year, LTG delivered over two dozen presentations to various groups and stakeholders across campus educating over 400 users on different learning technology topics and our services in general. (Let us know if you want us to visit your department next!)
  • Sean McClelland was invited to deliver his Better Presenter training sessions four times to faculty, staff, and students.
  • Sean and Dylan presented at TLC Day delivering two workshops on exciting new ideas and technologies in education, Flipping the Classroom and Web Conferencing.
  • Dylan presented at the July Apple Play Date event on asynchronous tools in education. This experience was a catalyst to develop and support a School of Nursing assignment where students developed a PechaKucha learning activity.

We launched a new CLE Course Redesign Service!

Effective and engaging use of the CLE is just as important as making sure it runs well. This year, LTG launched a course redesign service to help faculty do what they do best and leave the course design to the professionals. Dylan and Liz helped faculty with a full-service redesign of their courses and countless staff and teaching assistants with thinking through the best way to design specific activities.

We stepped up our Articulate Studio support!

If you were looking to build an eLearning module, add some interaction to your course, or even just narrate some PowerPoint, it became easier than ever in 2014. Liz built an Articulate Studio support center and developed comprehensive documentation for using the tool. She helped dozens of customers build modules, narrate their presentations, and upload them to the CLE, including some with SCORM output for reporting to the CLE Gradebook.

We boosted our Quiz tool support!

LTG continued to revamp both online and in-person support for CLE Quizzes. (Don’t let the term “Quiz” fool you; these can be high-stakes exams taken by more than 150 students at a time). We listened to requests for more secure online exams and piloted Respondus Lockdown Browser during Summer 2014. The pilot was a success and we are eager to implement Respondus Lockdown Browser as a permanent part of the CLE in early 2015!

Convergence had an amazing year!

It was a banner year for our blog – yes, the one you are reading right now! Convergence had phenomenal success this year with a rise in readership. We posted a whopping 37 blog posts to give customers access to the latest and greatest information in learning technologies at UCSF. Liz’s August post on Personalizing CLE Courses was retweeted on Moodle News to over 8,000 followers.

We launched the Media@UCSF plug-in!

2014 brought the much-anticipated video sharing integration to the CLE! Now, anyone with a MyAccess account can upload, store, and share videos on the CLE to other UCSF affiliates.

We built a new Support Center!

This year, we built a new Support Center to house our documentation, tutorials, and resources to help you better use learning technologies at UCSF. With the roll out of this new site, Sean worked to clearly define our service offerings and create policies to help us deliver the best service possible. We also launched newly developed templates and style guides for new documentation. More details on this exciting new site coming in 2015!

Pfew, what a year it’s been! And we’re already working away on making 2015 another successful year! Some of the other services you can look forward to from the LTG are:

  • Revamp of the CLE Online Workshop
  • Launch of Articulate Storyline in the Tech Commons
  • New user-directed equipment reservation system
  • And more!

Happy holidays to UCSF and all ed tech communities! See you in 2015!

Image Credits: LTG picture taken by Megan Laurence, Number 1, Number 2, Number 3, Number 4, Number 5, Number 6, Number 7, Number 8, Number 9, Number 10

Categories: Convergence

App Santa is Back!

Mobilized - Tue, 2014-12-23 00:30

If you’re an iOS user, you might want to check this out.

For a limited time, get discounts on a selection of popular apps, many of which can help with productivity and idea capture. If you have a break over the holidays, it can be a perfect time to explore a new app or two before the hectic pace resumes. Boost your effectiveness in the new year!

Categories: Mobilized

2014 Winter Holiday Closure

Brought to Light Blog - Fri, 2014-12-19 11:23

The Archives and Special Collections will be closed from Wednesday, December 23, 2014 through Thursday, January 1st, 2015. We will reopen on Friday, January 2nd.

Gingerbread version of The Anatomy of Human Body: Illustrated in One Hundred & Fifty Eight Plates by the UCSF Library 5th floor staff.

For our entry into the UCSF Library staff gingerbread house contest we used the pieces of the house to create a rare book in a cradle, specifically, we made a tastier version of Andrew Fyfe’s The Anatomy of the Human Body: Illustrated in One Hundred and Fifty Eight Plates, 1830, that we showed you earlier this fall on the blog

Happy holidays again! See you in the new year!

Categories: Brought to Light

Film, Edit, Share . . . Without Leaving Your Smartphone

Mobilized - Wed, 2014-12-17 15:09

Check out this new video from the UCSF Tech Commons on how to properly use the keyboard trays in the Library’s computer labs.

This video will not be nominated for an award at the Sundance Film Festival this year, but would you believe it was filmed, edited, and distributed using just an iPhone? It was, and this post showcases the workflow and technology used to create and share a video using a single device that fits in your hand. It also follows up the previous Mobilized post, Top 5 Tips for Better Mobile Video.

Why Mobile Video?

Before we dive into all the tools and tech available for this type of project, let’s make sure we understand why we would want to use our mobile device to produce a video. Here are just a few scenarios where you may want to take out your phone and start recording (and then editing):

  • Interview a colleague to promote a new service in your school or department
  • Document a conference or professional development event
  • Create a video to use on your website or in your CLE course
  • The digital video equipment offered through the UCSF Library is not available
  • You have a limited budget and little digital video experience

Notice what these different videos have in common? They all involve short videos that require minimal editing and have a clear objective.

Now that we have thought about the Why, let’s talk about the How. The keyboard tray video was filmed, edited, and shared using just one device, but I combined a number of apps and equipment to accomplish this, including:

  1. iPhone 6 camera to record video
  2. Slow-Mo setting on the iPhone 6 camera
  3. Voice Memos app on the iPhone 6 to record audio
  4. iMovie iPhone app to edit the footage
  5. YouTube to upload and distribute the video
  6. Tripod for filming
Workflow

Here is a summary of my workflow used to create the video:

1. PLAN

Just because I used a mobile device to create this video, it does not mean I could skip outlining the video, that is, storyboarding! The first thing I did was outline what I wanted to cover in the video and identified the clips, audio, and images that I needed to capture. I turned this into a list of video clips and pictures (a shot list) that I could quickly check off while filming.

This is what my storyboard looked like:

2. FILM

Armed with my storyboard and shot list, I started filming the clips in sequence using the iPhone 6 camera. You may notice that certain audio in the video carries over from one clip to the next. This was done by recording audio in the Voice Memo app, which I later imported in the iMovie video project during editing.

An extremely helpful piece of equipment for this project was the tripod. I recently purchased the Kooteck Tripod for Smartphones from Amazon.com for $12.99. This resulted in steadier, more professional-looking shots, especially when shooting in slow motion. I also used the iPhone’s camera to take a few pictures that I used for b-roll, also known as alternative footage.

Oh, and don’t forget to hold your phone horizontally while filming! There are very good reasons to avoid vertical videos. Learn more about Vertical Video Syndrome.

3. EDIT

I purchased the iPhone iMovie app for $4.99 to edit the video. I chose iMovie, because I use the desktop application frequently and was interested in how the video editing experience differed on a 4.7” screen. Of course, there are many other free and paid video-editing apps to choose from in both the Android and Apple iOS markets. If there is a specific app that you like to use, please let us know in the comment section below!

Using the iMovie app, I added titles, transitions, and a jingle to enhance the video. The jingles that come with the iMovie app are royalty free, but there are fewer options in the mobile app than what you get in the desktop version of iMovie. Even though my audio options were limited, I was still able to use sound to cover up some awkward silences and improve the overall quality of the video.

Here is a screenshot from my iMovie project showing the video and audio tracks:

When I was finished, I exported the final video out of iMovie to the iPhone camera roll. The size of the 36-second video was just 7MB (not bad)!

4. SHARE

Now for the easy part — sharing your masterpiece with colleagues! I uploaded the final video directly from my iPhone to YouTube, which only took a few moments. I added a description as well as important metadata or tags to help people find the video when searching. I uploaded the video to YouTube because YouTube integrates well with the platform used for this blog, making it easier to embed my final video in the post you are reading now.

I can now share my video in an email, via the UCSF CLE, or on my department website! Make sure to check out UCSF’s media distribution system, Media@UCSF, for sharing UCSF-related videos. You can also read more about Media@UCSF on the Convergence blog.

That’s a Wrap

And that is one example of how you can film, edit, and share a video using only your mobile device! This video took no more than an hour to create from start to finish and was done using only the iPhone. No work was done using a laptop or desktop computer and no cables were needed!

Do you need assistance creating your own video using a mobile device? Stop by the UCSF Library’s Tech Commons or attend a Tech Clinic with the Learning Technologies Group for tips and tricks for creating your own video. Remember, you do not need an iPhone 6 to create an effective video — you just need to know the tools, apps, and resources available, and start filming!

Check out the resources below for creating videos using mobile devices:

Lastly, thank you UCSF Library staff member, Ben Stever for your patience and cooperation during the filming of this video!

Categories: Mobilized

Holiday Wishes from UCSF Archives!

Brought to Light Blog - Wed, 2014-12-17 13:20

Dear supporters and friends of UCSF Archives & Special Collections!

We would like to express our gratitude to all of you for your help in building our historical collections through donations of rare books, personal papers, and unique artifacts. Thank you for taking the time to read how UCSF Archives preserves the history of UCSF.
Over the past several years we have been providing archival documents, photographs and film footage to enrich the celebration of UCSF’s 150th Anniversary. This year we inaugurated archives lecture series and launched a Twitter account to share historical tidbits, provide updates on events, acquisitions and our diverse projects. Currently the archives team is working on several exhibits commemorating UCSF’s achievements that will be opened in 2015.

Looking forward to serving you in the New Year!

Categories: Brought to Light

New UCSF Library Subject Guide on Data Sharing and Data Management

In Plain Sight - Wed, 2014-12-17 11:08

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funding bodies increasingly require grant-holders to develop and implement Data Management and Sharing Plans (DMPs). Plans typically state what data will be created and how, and outline the plans for sharing and preservation, noting what is appropriate given the nature of the data and any restrictions that may need to be applied.

The Library has created a new Subject Guide that provides an introduction to data sharing and data management, with an emphasis on those issues affecting those of you submitting grant applications to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). New Library-supported tools such as DataShare and DMPTool are highlighted.

Categories: In Plain Sight

UCSF Clock Tower

Brought to Light Blog - Thu, 2014-12-11 13:04

Millberry Union Clock Tower, 2014

Have you ever noticed the large transparent clock on the exterior of Millberry Union? It looks like this:

I walk past it often without giving it a second thought, but the clock tower has quite an interesting history.

Often referred to now as the “Founders’ Clock,” it is also known as the “Toland Clock Tower” and “Seth Thomas Clock.” You may also have seen photographs of the Old Medical School building from time to time, with a large clock atop the center of the building– the same clock as Millberry’s clock.

One of our rotating banner images here on Brought to Light depicts the old Medical Building, including the Seth Thomas Clock, through the lens of well-known photographer Ansel Adams. It’s a slice of this photograph:

Ansel Adams, Clock Tower of old Affiliated Colleges building, with new structures in fog, August 1964

The above building was the College of Medicine, and the first building to have been erected on the Parnassus campus in 1897. Seth Thomas was a well-known clockmaker in Connecticut in the early and mid 19th century. The clock was brought to San Francisco via ship that traveled around Cape Horn, South America to be a crown jewel in the Affiliated Colleges campus. The image, taken in 1964, shows the old College of Medicine building surrounded by the more modern campus buildings of today in the background and on the left. When the old College of Medicine building was torn down in 1967, a group of “friends of the clock”, led by Alison Saunders, MD and assisted by Meyer Schindler, MD ’38, formed to ensure it’s safekeeping until it could be moved to a new location on campus. “We have salvaged the granite pillars and blocks as well as the clock from the old building that was a landmark on Parnassus Heights . . . ,” Dr. Alison Saunders declared in 1969 as chair of the UCSF Campus Court Development Commission.

The process to find the famous clock a new home took 14 years. Finally, in 1982 the inner-workings of the clock were reinstalled on Millberry Union, 500 Parnassus Ave, where it lives today.

Founders Clock, Millberry Union, circa 1982

Next time you’re walking around the Parnassus campus, take a closer look at the historic clock. It is a work of art worthy of our attention.

The inscription reads: “Carried by ship around Cape Horn, this Seth Thomas Clock was installed on the Medical School of the Affiliated Colleges in 1897. Surviving the 1906 earthquake, it served the University and community for 70 years. Members of the UCSF family have made possible its restoration as a campus landmark.”

Check out this article that details the historical inspiration for a new clock, “Saunder’s Clock,” in the Mission Hall courtyard of the UCSF Mission Bay campus.

Categories: Brought to Light

Exploring the Archives for 150: Dr. Mary Olney’s Summer Camp for Children with Diabetes

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2014-12-09 10:02

In preparation for UCSF’s 150th anniversary celebration exhibits, we’ve been doing a bit of exploring in the vaults. For the next several months, I’ll be posting some of the treasures we’ve discovered!

In 1938, UCSF pediatrician Mary B. Olney founded the first wilderness camp in California for children with diabetes. Unlike many of her contemporaries, Dr. Olney believed that diabetic children could live active, healthy lives through proper disease management. Dr. Olney, known as “Doc” to her young patients, provided a fun, supportive space and encouraged campers to take control of their health. Bearskin Meadow Camp is still active today thanks in large part to the tradition of care and empowerment fostered by Olney.

Dr. Mary Olney on a hike, ca. 1940. MSS 98-64, box 1, folder 6

Dr. Olney graduated from UCSF in 1932. She completed her training in pediatrics at San Francisco General Hospital and was later appointed Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at UCSF. At the time of her death in 1993, Olney had served the UCSF community for over fifty years.

A camp postcard filled in by Dr. Mary Olney while at Bearskin Meadow. It is addressed to her father, 1961. MSS 98-64, box 1, folder 27

Olney’s first group of campers attended a two-week session at Los Posados in Napa County. The camp eventually developed into Bearskin Meadow, a permanent campsite located near Kings Canyon National Park. The camp welcomed boys and girls and provided coeducational activities. Diabetes management instruction focused on diet, exercise, and proper insulin administration.

Dr. Mary Olney teaching a nutrition class for campers. MSS 98-64, box 1, folder 6

Camp staff performing urinalyses. Photograph with original caption, perhaps from a deconstructed scrapbook. MSS 98-64, box 2, folder 45

Olney and the counselors, many of whom were medical students, taught a holistic system of care that campers could take home with them.

Camp staff and counselors, ca. 1941. MSS 98-64, box 1, folder 34

Alongside nutrition classes and medication instruction, campers took nature hikes, learned to swim, played sports, and sang campfire songs. As Olney later noted in a 1988 interview in the UCSF Alumni Faculty Association Bulletin, this physically robust approach to diabetes management differed dramatically from older systems. Olney remembered that when campers first arrived, they often “didn’t know they could do hiking because the old way of treating diabetes was to let the child go from school to home and sit in a chair until suppertime and then go to bed.”

Camp announcement noting the different activities of a typical camp day, 1962. MSS 98-64, box 2, folder 77

UCSF continues to honor and support Olney’s work through the Mary B. Olney MD / KAK Chair in Pediatric Diabetes and Clinical Research. In the archives, we house the Mary B. Olney papers, MSS 98-64. The collection includes camp photographs, correspondence, meal plans, and publicity and fundraising material. It also contains records relating to the Diabetic Youth Foundation, an organization created by Olney and her longtime partner Dr. Ellen Simpson to help administer the camp and other services.

The cover image of Bear Facts, vol II, no. 6, a publication created by campers and counselors at Bearskin Meadow Camp. The Mary B. Olney collection includes numerous different issues of Bear Facts. MSS 98-64, box addition 3, folder 4

To view more items from the Mary B. Olney papers, visit our digital collections!

Categories: Brought to Light

5 Questions with Dr. Daniel Lowenstein

The Better Presenter - Mon, 2013-07-29 08:30

In the previous post, we were introduced to Dr. Daniel Lowenstein and his “Last Lecture” presentation, which was both powerful and inspiring. Shortly after writing the post, Dr. Lowenstein contacted me, and we had an interesting discussion about his experience preparing for, and delivering that presentation.

I have always wanted to incorporate the voices of the instructors, students, and staff at UCSF, who work in the trenches and present or attend presentations on a daily basis. This post marks the beginning of a new series that will feature interviews of those people. I hope you enjoy the first episode of “5 Questions!”

5 Questions with Dr. Lowenstein

Bonus track: The Basement People

The full version of the original presentation has recently been uploaded to the UCSF Public Relations YouTube channel, so please head over there to watch the video, like it, and leave your comments!

If you have any ideas about who the next 5 Questions interviewee should be, please contact me or leave your ideas in the comments section below.

Categories: Better Presenter

Top 5 Lessons Learned from The Last Lecture

The Better Presenter - Thu, 2013-05-16 12:58

Powerful. Inspirational. Emotionally moving.

Those are the words that best describe Dr. Daniel Lowenstein’s “The Last Lecture” presentation, delivered to a packed house in Cole Hall on April 25th. The Last Lecture is an annual lecture series hosted by a UCSF professional school government group (and inspired by the original last lecture), in which the presenter is hand-picked by students and asked to respond to the question, ”If you had but one lecture to give, what would you say?” Dr. Daniel Lowenstein, epilepsy specialist and director of the UCSF Epilepsy Center, did not disappoint. In fact, I can say with confidence that he delivered one of the best presentations that I have attended.

Rather than attempt to paraphrase his words, or provide a Cliff Notes version that doesn’t do his presentation justice, I will instead encourage you to watch the video recording of his presentation. The video is an hour in length, and if you have any interest in becoming a better presenter yourself, it is a must-watch. After the jump, we’ll explore my top “top 5 lessons learned” from Dr. Lowenstein’s presentation.

Last Lecture – Top 5 Lessons Learned:

  1. “PowerPoint” is still boring. Dr. Lowenstein’s projected slide show was not typical PowerPoint. It did not consist of any bullet points, familiar and boring templates, or images “borrowed” from a last minute Google image search. Instead, used images from his own collection, and Prezi to build a canvas of images that moved in all directions, expanding, contracting and rotating to craft his message. The resulting slide show was personal, meaningful and most importantly, relatable.
  2. Story telling is the secret to success. When I first began studying the art of presenting, the idea of incorporating storytelling into a presentation was an elusive one. I am now convinced that storytelling is the secret to transforming a good presentation, into a great presentation. It is the glue that holds all of the elements of your presentation together, as well as the glitter that makes it shine. Dr. Lowenstein’s entire presentation was crafted into a story, the setting of which was established right from the beginning and illustrated by his first content slide. There were also chapters within the story, the most memorable of which for me was the Justice segment of his presentation, and his depiction of The Basement People. He didn’t begin by pointing out the original members of the UCSF Black Caucus that were in the audience, as most presenters would have done. Instead, he gradually painted a picture for us, so we could imagine what it was like to be a minority at UCSF over 50 years ago. He described their struggles in detail, and gave us time to relate, and even pointed out the fact that they had met in that very hall where we all sat. He didn’t reveal their presence until the end of the chapter, creating a crescendo of emotion, and the moment brought tears to the eyes of many audience members.
  3. Vulnerability equals trust. If you want your audience to believe in your message, you must first give them a reason to believe in you. And one of the most effective ways to make that happen is to share your vulnerabilities. In the eyes of the audience, this makes the presenter human, and it creates a bond between both parties. No one wants to listen to a sales-pitch presentation. Instead, they want the whole story with the ups and downs, so they can decide how we feel about it on their own terms. Just be sure to share vulnerabilities that relate to the subject of the presentation, because you’re going for empathy, not sympathy (which could have a negative effect). Dr. Lowenstein, when talking about Joy and Sorrow, shared one of his deepest personal sorrows, which was the unexpected passing of his son. In contrast, he shared a touching moment with his wife, expressing his love for her, right in front of the whole audience. These moments worked perfectly in the presentation because they were genuine, and they gave the audience a deeper understanding of Dr. Lowenstein.
  4. Don’t forget humor. No matter how serious, no matter how technical, there is a place in your presentation for a little humor. It can be used to lighten a heavy moment, open closed minds, and bring everyone in a room together (even if your audience members have very different backgrounds). Amidst Dr. Lowenstein’s presentation were timely moments of humor that seemed to come naturally from his personality. And hey, who doesn’t like a good male-patterened-baldness joke, anyway?! But seriously, if you can laugh at yourself, the audience has no excuse to not laugh along with you. There are two keys to using humor in your presentation; (1) it should be relevant to the current topic or story, and (2) it can’t be forced. If you’re not good at telling jokes, then try another form of humor!
  5. Present on your passions. As a presenter, your goal is simple – to instill in the audience an understanding of your message, and a belief in you. If you give them the impression, even for a moment, that you don’t believe in yourself or the message you’re presenting, you’re a dead man walking (or presenting) in the audience’s eyes. If you choose topics that you are passionate about, however, you will never have this problem. You may think it was easy for Dr. Lowenstein’s to be passionate about his presentation, because his task was, in essence, to present about his life’s passions… but I can assure you, it’s not easy to talk about your own life in front of an audience. In contrast, imagine that you have to give a presentation on, say, your department’s new accounting policies. To make matters worse, imagine that your audience is being forced to attend. What do you do? Surely, there is no passion to be found in accounting policy, is there?! Well, actually, there is, if you take the right angle. For example, does this new accounting policy save the department time, or money? And then, can that saved time and money be applied towards more constructive, or creative tasks that your coworkers actually want to do? If so, and you frame the presentation in a positive light, the audience will listen.

To top it all off, Dr. Lowenstein spent the last few minutes of his presentation reviewing each of the 4 segments of his talk, and then related it all back to a single, clear message. That, my friends, is an example of storytelling 101, so I hope you were talking notes!

Continue on to part 2 of this post, where I interview Dr. Lowenstein about his experiences preparing for and delivering the Last Lecture presentation!

If you also found inspiration in Dr. Lowenstein’s presentation, please share your thoughts below, and I’ll see you at next year’s “Last Lecturer” event.

Categories: Better Presenter
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