Feed aggregator

Collections in the Media

Brought to Light Blog - Mon, 2015-03-30 09:31

We’re proud to tell you about two new documentaries that used material from our collections and are hitting screens big and small near you.

Ken Burns’ new 3-part documentary, Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies, premieres on PBS tonight, March 30. The film “examines cancer with a cellular biologist’s precision, a historian’s perspective and a biographer’s passion. The series artfully weaves three different films in one: a riveting historical documentary; an engrossing and intimate vérité film; and a scientific and investigative report.” It’s based on the book written by physician and oncologist Siddhartha Mukherjee and published in 2010, described as a “biography of cancer.”

[Note for UCSF Library fans: Mukherjee is married to Sarah Sze, the artist who created the mirror polished stainless steel sculpture in the front stairwell of the Parnassus library.]

 

The film Merchants of Doubt, by the filmmakers of Food, Inc., is now playing in theaters in San Francisco (and elsewhere). It’s “the troubling story of how a cadre of influential scientists have clouded public understanding of scientific facts to advance a political and economic agenda.” The team was on-site for several days, interviewing UCSF Professor Stan Glantz in our reading room and filming in the vault.

 

Let us know if you’re able to see either film! What did you think?

And, of course, contact us anytime via our online contact form to submit a question or comment. You can also email us directly at libraryarchives@ucsf.edu.

Categories: Brought to Light

Ember CLI, Heroku, and You

CKM Blog - Mon, 2015-03-23 10:15

A disclaimer: This is not for use in production. Doing this for a production app would be a bad decision.

The problem: Developers on the Ilios Project need to be able to share their changes with other team members. While it is possible to deploy a static Ember CLI app nearly anywhere, we want to include our mock API so everyone is looking at the same data.

The solution: Use Heroku to host an Ember CLI application running its built in Express server.

Start by reading Heroku’s excellent Getting Started in NodeJs documentation. Make sure you set up a demo app as instructed.

Now lets create a branch and setup your own Ember CLI app.

cd [YOUR APP DIRECTORY] git checkout -b heroku heroku create [whatever-name-you-want]

You will now have a Procfile in your apps root directory. Change the contents to:

web: ember serve --port $PORT --live-reload=false

This will tell Heroku how to start your Ember CLI app using the port of their choice, and to switch off live-reload.

Next we need to insure that npm will install bower for us.

npm install bower --save-dev

Then we have to modify our package.json to run bower install after npm install. Do this by adding "postinstall": "./node_modules/bower/bin/bower install" to the scripts section.

"scripts": { "start": "ember server", "build": "ember build", "test": "ember test", "postinstall": "./node_modules/bower/bin/bower install" },

We want to make sure npm installs all of our development dependencies for us. Including Ember CLI itself, this is done by setting a configuration variable on Heroku.

heroku config:set NPM_CONFIG_PRODUCTION=false

That should do it. Commit your changes and push your branch to Heroku. If everything works, merge the branch into master.

# git add Procfile package.json # git commit -m "Our heroku setup" # git push heroku heroku:master

Enjoy!
@iam_jrjohnson

Categories: CKM

Moodle MOOC Videos

Convergence - Fri, 2015-03-20 12:41

Do you know that Moodle, the system that powers the UCSF CLE is used by other universities and training providers around the world?

For the second consecutive year, Moodle has offered a MOOC (massively open online course) for the millions of global Moodle users. Although the 2015 MOOC has come to an end, Moodle has made all of the instructional videos available on YouTube.

Click to view the 38 Moodle videos available on YouTube:

While the version of Moodle used in the MOOC videos may look a little different than the UCSF CLE, the underlying tasks and workflows are going to be very similar. Watch videos on topics ranging from editing course sections to managing the Moodle gradebook.

Please note the videos use Moodle 2.8, while the UCSF CLE currently uses Moodle 2.6. Some features and functionality shown in the videos may not be available in the CLE.

Have questions about the Moodle MOOC videos? Contact the Learning Technologies Group.

Image Credit: Moodle Trust

Categories: Convergence

Women’s History Month – Dr. Florence Nightingale Ward

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2015-03-17 08:49

Continuing our look at talented and trailblazing women, we’re highlighting the work of homeopathic physician Florence Nightingale Saltonstall Ward (1860-1919).

Illustration of Ward from the San Francisco Chronicle, July 11, 1895. MSS 2011-08, box 1

Ward was a prominent San Francisco surgeon, obstetrician, and gynecologist from 1887 to her death in 1919. She dedicated her life to providing safer, more accessible medical care for women and developing techniques that made childbirth less dangerous.

Ward received medical training from a number of hospitals and schools in Europe and the United States, including California’s foremost homeopathic institution, Hahnemann Medical College of the Pacific. She later served as Professor of Obstetrics at Hahnemann and held leadership positions in local and national organizations, including becoming vice president of the American Institute of Homeopathy. In 1915, Ward became the second woman to be elected to the American College of Surgeons, an appointment that recognized her many contributions to the fields of gynecology and surgery.

Ward’s diploma from the New York Polyclinic Medical School, 1888. MSS 2011-08, oversize box 1

Ward built her own sanatorium exclusively for women in San Francisco between 1907 and 1910. She employed an all-female staff and provided unique career opportunities for women with professional medical training.

Invitation to Ward’s sanitarium, circa 1910. MSS 2011-08, box 1

Ward’s practice blended conventional medical techniques with homeopathic remedies and treatments. Homeopathy was developed by Samuel Hahnemann in the early 19th century. His system was based on the theory that a substance that causes certain symptoms in a healthy person will cure those symptoms in a sick person. Ward was likely drawn to homeopathy in part because the field provided more opportunities for women than conventional medical practice. For instance, homeopathy schools regularly accepted female students while medical schools routinely denied women applicants because of their gender. Homeopathic professional organizations also welcomed women’s participation. As women struggled to find a place in the American Medical Association, Ward and other women helped lead the American Institute of Homeopathy and delivered papers at major homeopathy conferences.

Ward’s list of symptoms and their homeopathic treatments, ca. 1890. MSS 2011-08, upstairs vault

At UCSF, we house the Florence Nightingale Ward papers, MSS 2011-08, and a collection of rare homeopathy material. Ward’s papers include homeopathic medicine kits used by her in the late 19th century. Take a look inside one monogrammed kit below. Many of the vials contain substances still used in homeopathic remedies today!

Ward’s monogrammed homeopathic medicine kit, circa 1890. MSS 2011-08, upstairs vault

Ward’s monogrammed homeopathic medicine kit, circa 1890. MSS 2011-08, upstairs vault

Ward’s monogrammed homeopathic medicine kit, detail, circa 1890. MSS 2011-08, upstairs vault

Ward’s monogrammed homeopathic medicine kit, detail, circa 1890. MSS 2011-08, upstairs vault

Categories: Brought to Light

New TCA Archivist

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2015-03-17 08:30

David Krah

David Krah joins UCSF to work on processing collections in the Tobacco Control Archives. He will work alongside David Uhlich on processing state reports on tobacco control policy as well as the balance of unprocessed collections held in the Tobacco Control Archives.

David has a Masters Degree in Library and Information Science from San Jose State University, with a concentration in Archival Studies. He has worked on archival projects with the California Historical Society, the San Francisco Public Library, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, the Road & Track Magazine collection at Stanford University, and previously worked on the Ira Herskowitz papers and Lawrence Crooks Radiologic Imaging Laboratory records at UCSF.

He is a native Californian with interests in California history and transportation and livability issues. He enjoys composing and performing experimental and song-form music and cycling jauntily. He lives in San Francisco with his wife Nia and newborn daughter Thalia.

Categories: Brought to Light

Women’s History Month – Ellen Brown

Brought to Light Blog - Thu, 2015-03-12 09:03

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’re spotlighting a few of the many talented and trailblazing women who have been important in the history of UCSF and you may not have heard of before.

Today, read a little about the remarkable life and career of Ellen Brown, MD. We are fortunate to have Brown’s manuscript collection, MSS 87-42, and her oral history in the UCSF Archives & Special Collections.

Ellen Brown was born in San Francisco in 1912. She and her older brother Fred were raised by her parents, Warner and Jessie Brown, in Berkeley. Jessie was a high school teacher and botanist and Warner was a professor of psychology at UC Berkeley. Fred died at the age of 16 of respiratory complications of polio. His death had a lasting impact on Brown– she dreamed of becoming a doctor as a child.

Ed Fong, Tesauro, and Brown in June, 1939.

Brown attended University High School in Oakland and went on to study at the University of California Berkeley, graduating with a bachelors degree in 1934. She continued to the UC Medical School’s San Francisco campus and graduated with her medical degree in 1939. In a class of  63 students, she was one of a handful of women.

Following graduation, Brown became chief resident under William J. Kerr, UC Chair of Medicine, from 1939-1943. The two worked closely for years– prioritizing cardiovascular research at UCSF. Brown helped to found the , which opened in 1958. Kerr was instrumental in laying the groundwork for the Cardiovascular Research Institute (CVRI), procuring the space on the 13th floor of Moffitt Hospital and funding from both UCSF and the National Heart Institute. The CVRI opened in 1958 with Brown as a co-founder and, later, a senior staff member. (Check out some of the CVRI’s milestones here.)

Ellen Brown at Harvard Medical School, 1946

Brown’s academic appointment at UCSF began with clinical instructor, 1943-1944, moved to associate professor, 1946-1959, and became professor of medicine in 1959. In 1944-1946 she was a Commonwealth Fund fellow in the Department of Physiology at Harvard Medical School (see photo above) and in 1958 she was a Guggenheim Fellow at Oxford University.

Brown operated a lab on campus for peripheral vascular research though the 1960s and 1970s. Concurrently, she worked on improving teaching techniques in predoctoral medical classes, initiating the “Introduction to Clinical Medicine” course and later serving as a residency evaluator for the School of Medicine.

This quote, from Brown’s oral history, demonstrates her zeal for education, enthusiasm for change in curriculum, and sense of humor: “The wonderful thing was how interested all these people in the non-medicine departments were. An ophthalmologist would sit down with a bunch of absolute nerds, and come and do that, four or five times, and teach them. The hardest thing to learn to do is to see in an ophthalmoscope. It is for most doctors. It’s one of the last things you feel comfortable about. That and a pelvic exam, I guess.”

Over the course of her illustrious career, Brown’s research interests included capillary pressure and permeability, blood volume and vascular capacity, cardiac failure, cardiac complications of pregnancy, and peripheral circulation in relation to pain syndromes and vascular diseases.

Brown on Edgewood Ave behind the CVRI on May 29, 1960.

When Brown officially retired from UCSF in 1979, she became a professor emeritus of medicine. Ten years later, in 1989, Brown received UCSF’s highest honor, the UCSF Medal, for outstanding personal contributions to the University’s health sciences mission.

Brown and Francis Sooy, UCSF Chancellor 1972-1982, at the time of her retirement.

 

Brown passed away in October of 2006 at the age of 96. At that time, she gifted over $100,000 to the UCSF School of Medicine for the improvement of teaching for medical students.

Browns’ numerous contributions over the course of fifty plus years can still be felt today– through her impact on cardiovascular research as well as her in her insight and refinement of medical education.

Contact us if you have any questions or would like to learn more. And please don’t hesitate to use the calendar on the right to make an appointment to come in and use the collections!

Categories: Brought to Light

Tobacco Control Archive Processing Project

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2015-03-10 08:30

David Uhlich

The UCSF Archives recently received funding from the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education to catalog and process the Tobacco Control Archive collections and in particular the state reports materials that were compiled by Dr. Stanton Glantz’ research group while completing detailed histories of tobacco control policymaking and efforts by the tobacco industry to thwart these policies in 29 states.

Today I would like to introduce David Uhlich who just joined the archives team and will be working on the TCA processing project.

David holds a Master’s degree in Library and Information Science from San Jose State University, and for the past 6 years has worked for the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley. At the Bancroft, he was primarily responsible for processing political collections, and most recently led the project to process the papers of Governor Edmund G. “Pat” Brown.

Prior to this, David worked as an archivist at the Water Recourses Center Archives, the Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center, and the Tomales Regional History Center. He is a Certified Archivist and active member of the Society of California Archivists, where he currently serves as the Northern California chair of the Site Selection Committee.

David is a lifelong Californian, and for the past 8 years has lived in Marin County with his wife and two very large dogs.

Categories: Brought to Light

H-Index: What it is and How You Find Yours.

In Plain Sight - Mon, 2015-03-09 15:16

Journals have long been ranked in order of relative “importance” by their journal impact factor (IF), but that system has come under increasing criticism.  There is a more general debate on the validity of the impact factor as a measure of journal importance and the effect of policies that editors may adopt to boost their impact factor (perhaps to the detriment of readers and writers).

The h-index, originally described in 2005 by it’s namesake Jorge Hirsch, is a measurement that aims to describe the scientific productivity and impact of a researcher. The index is based on the set of the scientist’s most cited papers and the number of citations that they have received in other publications. The larger the number of important papers, the higher the h-index, regardless of where the work was published. It relies on citations to your papers, not the journals, which is a truer measure of quality.

A researcher’s h-index can be calculated manually by locating citation counts for all published papers and ranking them numerically by the number of times cited. However, Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar can also be used to calculate an h-index.

This video from the Medical College of Wisconsin describes the h-index in greater detail and how to find it using Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar.

 

Categories: In Plain Sight

Chemistry labs of Barlet

Brought to Light Blog - Thu, 2015-03-05 09:18

Among the many jewels of our rare book collection is Annibal Barlet’s work of 1657 Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie

The volume has been rebound in vellum. It is 626 pages with a woodcut frontispiece and contains 37 full-page woodcuts illustrating the diverse operations of alchemical processes in detail.

Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

Woodcuts depict various chemical apparatus and operations of a laboratory in the mid 17th century. Barlet gives accounts of instruments, vessels, processes, minerals, and recipes.

Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

Our copy has been digitized and is available in full via the HathiTrust Digital Library.

Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

Barlet, Annibal, Le vray et methodique cours de la physique resolutive, vulgairements dite chymie, 1657

 

Categories: Brought to Light

TimelineJS: A Superb Open Source Tool

Mobilized - Mon, 2015-03-02 16:13
What is it?

TimelineJS is a web-based tool that allows you to easily create visually-rich, interactive timelines generated by your data. It’s an open source tool from Knight Lab at Northwestern University and is free to use — all you need is your content and a Google Drive spreadsheet.

How it works

Just download the spreadsheet template from the TimelineJS website, input your text, images, and links, then upload it to your Google Drive account. Next, publish your spreadsheet in Google Drive according to TimelineJS directions, then return to the TimelineJS website to paste your Google sheet link and view the result. You can share the link or embed your timeline on your own website.

//

My timeline Same Sex Marriages in the United States and When They Took Effect uses the TimelineJS default settings for visual effects and themes, and I think those produce a clean, professional appearance. However, you can alter visual effects and themes to your satisfaction. You can also edit and update your data within the Google spreadsheet at any time, and the changes will automatically appear in your timeline. For instance, I’ve had to update marriage equality information for a number of new states!

Where it excels
  • TimelineJS scores big for ease of use. This spreadsheet method makes Timeline JS much simpler and faster to work with than other timeline tools that default to creating the timeline slide by slide and element by element.
  • It also really shines in its ability to display your timeline responsively. Check out a timeline on your phone. It adapts and looks good on both large and small screens, though I would recommend doing timeline creation on a large screen due to the complexities of inputting information.
Tips
  • There are no options for creating an account, so it’s important to keep track of links to timelines that you construct.
  • Each slide must have something entered in the Start Date column in order to display. Don’t alter the headings or delete columns from the spreadsheet template or the TimelineJS generator won’t work.
  • If your website runs on WordPress, you may need to use this plugin and your Google spreadsheet URL instead of the standard <iframe> embed code.
Who is it for?

TimelineJS is a flexible tool that can enhance many topics and areas of study. Most users will simply gather materials for the story they want to tell and enter them into the spreadsheet template. Those who have JSON skills can go further and create custom installations.

Timelines are an excellent way to visually convey transition and change within sciences or social movements, and there are lots of possibilities for teaching and learning. These can extend beyond simply the instructor presenting content to requiring class participation in gathering and describing the data. Since creation and editing of this timeline tool is done in a shareable Google spreadsheet, direct collaboration is possible. Students could also select and construct topics and histories individually or in group projects.

More examples

Be sure to look through some other examples for inspiration and ideas for your own timelines.

Categories: Mobilized

Viewing Zakheim Murals at UCSF

Brought to Light Blog - Mon, 2015-03-02 09:41

As part of UCSF’s 150th anniversary celebration, the university has arranged special public viewing hours for the Zakheim murals through the spring:

Friday, March 13th:  4 – 7 p.m.
Friday, April 17th:  3 – 5 p.m.
Friday, May 22nd:  3 – 5 p.m.

Location:
Toland Hall on the UCSF Campus
533 Parnassus Ave., Room U-142
San Francisco, CA
Map of UCSF Parnassus Campus and Directions (printable PDF)

Recent article in San Francisco Chronicle highlights history of the Zakheim murals at UCSF.

Do you have questions or need additional information about public viewing?
Please contact UCSF Public Affairs: 415-476-2557

Categories: Brought to Light

ReadCube Enhanced PDF Launches Across Wiley Journal Content

In Plain Sight - Thu, 2015-02-26 15:36

 

 

ReadCube is a free desktop and browser-based program for managing, annotating, and accessing academic research articles. It also allows users to enhance eligible PDF  files with both the browser-based and desktop application. Once enhanced, articles have interactive citations, integrated author information, and access to stored supplements.  Additionally, users can highlight sections of documents and write notes saved within the client.

ReadCube has been getting a lot of attention due to its partnerships with several publishing companies including the Nature Publishing Group, and now Wiley. When you find an article through ReadCube’s Web Reader, Desktop app or one of its publishing partners websites (Nature.com/Wiley.com), you’ll be presented with unique access options: Rent, Cloud or PDF. ReadCube Access provides options to buy or, uniquely, rent individual research articles.

Note however that the Rent/Cloud/PDF options should never display for UC-licensed articles. UCSF users will see the PIA options when viewing articles in a Nature or Wiley journal that we don’t subscribe to. If you’re interested you can go to the website for the journal Interdisciplinary Reviews: RNA  Choose an article that doesn’t have the open access lock icon, then click on PDF.

ReadCube’s Rent/ Cloud/PDF options are more fully described in this article from the California Digital Library (CDL).

For more information about the basic desktop ReadCube see this previous post and a Wikipedia article.

Categories: In Plain Sight

The New Media Gallery

Convergence - Thu, 2015-02-26 13:14

As you may have already heard, Media@UCSF is fully integrated with the CLE, and provides instructors and students with tools to create and share videos in a course. We have been using this feature in the CLE since the Fall, and it’s been working great. And now we are excited to announce that one of its additional features, the Media Gallery, is fully deployed and ready for use!

What is the Media Gallery, who can add video to it, and how can it be used in a course? Here are a few highlights:

  • The Media Gallery is a collection of videos specific to one, and only one course.
  • It is accessible from the link in the Navigation block.
  • Faculty and students can add videos to the Media Gallery!
  • Student videos require (by default) moderation from a course editor.
  • Comments can be enabled.
  • This is a quick and easy way to post a video as a conversation starter before class.
  • The Gallery is a great way for students to share video project with their classmates.

A few gotchas to note about the Media Gallery:

  • We turned on the ability for students to submit videos to the Media Gallery on February 11th, 2015. If your course was created before then, and you have previously accessed the Media Gallery, you’ll need to enable the “moderate content” setting manually.
  • Media Gallery videos cannot be “imported” from course to course, so they do not “roll over” into the new semester’s course. It is very easy, however, to add videos back into the Media Gallery, because they are stored in the owner’s My Media repository, and it only takes a few clicks.

We have a full write up, including a downloadable PDF with step-by-step instructions, available in our Support Center: Media@UCSF documentation

Check it out, and let us know how you use the Media Gallery. If you have any questions, please contact us!

Categories: Convergence

Early MRI Scans

Brought to Light Blog - Thu, 2015-02-26 09:55

We’re currently processing the Radiologic Imaging Laboratory records, 1968-2000. The collection contains numerous images of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The images help document the lab’s achievements in MRI research and illustrate dramatic developments in the technology.

MRI head scan from a patient logbook, 1986. The image is from a Polaroid photograph of a computer screen. MSS 2002-08

MRI scan images come in several formats in the collection. These include marketing prints and slides, transparent film sheets and negatives, and Polaroid photographs. Lab researchers used Polaroid cameras to capture images on computer screens created by in-development software and hardware.

MRI head scan from a patient logbook, 1988. The image is from a Polaroid photograph of a computer screen. MSS 2002-08

Several of the laboratory notebooks in the collection contain Polaroid photographs fastened right to the page, with research notes and data surrounding them.

Laboratory notebook of Lawrence Crooks with scan images, 1983 (subject’s name redacted). MSS 2002-08

As you move chronologically through the collection, you can see the MRI scans becoming clearer and clearer as lab researchers improved the technology. You can also chart changes in the lab’s research subjects. Image subjects transition from phantom objects (containers often filled with baby oil and water) to lab animals and RIL staff and patients.

Prints prepared for a 1985 Diasonics/RIL sales meeting. MSS 2002-08

Though the images present preservation challenges, they contribute greatly to the research value of the collection. Using the scans, you can witness the lab’s growth through different phases of MRI research and development.

Categories: Brought to Light

Recent Acquisition: Bernard Zakheim Collection

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2015-02-24 09:45

Ever since the Polish-born artist Bernard Zakheim painted a series of murals at UCSF in 1930s they remain the jewel of the University’s Art Collection. These murals include ten panel series in Toland Hall, “History of Medicine in California,” and two panels originally located in the Cole Hall and later moved to the Health Sciences West (HSW) lecture halls – “Modern Medicine” and “Ancient Medicine: Superstition in Medicine.” Zakheim worked with Diego Rivera in Mexico City and is best known for contributing the Library Periodical Room fresco and helping organize the New Deal art project at the Coit Tower in San Francisco. From the time of their unveiling, the archives has been compiling reference materials about these murals and now we are delighted to report that a comprehensive set of materials documenting how these frescoes were created and preserved was donated to UCSF (Bernard Zakheim collection, MSS 2014-15).

Viewing murals at Toland Hall at UCSF, left to right: F. Stanley Durie, Superintendent of UC Hospital, Dr. William E. Carter, Phyllis Wrightson, Joseph Allen, State Director of WPA Federal Art Project, Bernard Zakehim (ca. 1939)

Last year I had the privilege to meet one of the sons of the artist who also helped restore the frescoes in 1970s when the wallpaper covering them for almost two decades was removed and the two panels were relocated from the original Cole Hall to HSW.

Artist Bernard Zakheim with his son Nathan Zakheim (1967)

One of the biggest archives’ advocates, Dr. Robert Sherins (SOM, 1963) introduced me to Nathan Zakheim. Nathan, a talented art conservator based in Los Angeles, is the keeper of his father’s extensive archives and art collection. Last fall we met at his warehouse to review and pack the documents destined for UCSF.

The idea to commission murals was brought by Dr. Isabella Perry, professor of pathology after seeing the frescoes Zakheim painted at the Alemany Public Health Center and then spearheaded by Chauncey D.  Leake, professor of pharmacology and medical historian. The university murals undertaking which was partially funded by the WPA Federal Art Project and also sponsored by the university was a true collaborative effort between Zakheim’s team and UCSF faculty (including renowned UCSF doctors,  Chauncey D. Leake, George Lyman, Langley Porter, Salvatore P. Lucia, W. E. Carter, and F. W Lynch). The artist was provided unrestricted access to the Crummer Room containing numerous books on the history of medicine, including recently published “California’s Medical Story” by Dr. Henry Harris. Zakheim’s assistant, Phyllis Wrightson did extensive research about California medical history which becomes apparent in the sketchbook that she kept for the project. The instruments depicted by her on these pages are still preserved at the archives’ artifact collection and will be displayed as part of the 150th anniversary exhibit.

Drawings of surgical instruments from the UCSF collection for the panel devoted to Don Pedro Prat, surgeon of the Portolá expedition.

Surgeon Don Pedro Prat treats patient’s leg, James Ohio Pattie vaccinates Californians.

One of the sketches portrays fur trader James Ohio Pattie who was captured for illegal trapping in California and earned his release from Mexican imprisonment in San Diego by using the smallpox vaccine to curtail the epidemic spreading among Californians (that story based on the Pattie’s “Personal Narrative” was later proved to be inaccurate as it was measles epidemic* that occurred in Alta California at that time).

Bernard Zakheim at work, 1937

Drawing of James Ohio Pattie.

Bernard Zakheim and his team interviewed numerous faculty members who are depicted in the panel “Rational Medicine,” including Robert Stone, professor of radiology, Francis S. Smith, pediatrician and dean of the School of Medicine, Karl F. Meyer, director of the Hooper Foundation, anesthesiologist Arthur Guedel and Isabella Perry to name just a few.

Scaffoldings in the original Cole Hall (that was located at the School of Medicine building) set up while Bernard Zakheim was working on the panel “Rational Medicine.”

We are grateful to the Zakheim family and in particular to Nathan Zakheim for donating this unique collection to the University. It will be organized and described in the next few months, selected slides and documents will be digitized and uploaded to the library website.
Are you interested in viewing the murals, but unable to visit San Francisco? Please check these two video recordings from the UCSF archives:
Dr. Robert Schindler (Chair emeritus of the UCSF Department of Otolaryngology) presents a video tour of the murals painted by Bernard Zakheim in Toland Hall at UCSF, 1996: https://archive.org/details/cum_00001
Toland Hall murals tour by Dr. Chauncey Leake, 1976: https://archive.org/details/cum_000015

We would also like to bring to your attention a manuscript put together by Dr. Sherins chronicling the life story and work of Bernard Zakheim that can be accessed on the Alumni Association website.

* Valle, Rosemary K. “James Ohio Pattie and the 1827-1828 Alta California Measles Epidemic.” California Historical Quarterly, Vol. 52, No. 1 (Spring, 1973), pp. 28-36, http://www.jstor.org/stable/25157415.

Categories: Brought to Light

You Spoke, We Listened. CLE Updated

Convergence - Wed, 2015-02-18 08:18

Today, we made some changes to the CLE interface based on feedback we received from users since the new interface was released last summer. This short post provides some details on these changes.

Login-Logout/Help Links / Menu icon

The login-logout and help links that appear at the top right of CLE pages will now remain visible at all times. Previously, as the screen size decreased (e.g., on tablets and smartphones), these links would disappear and move into the menu icon (also known as the hamburger icon). One needs to tap on the menu icon to view these links. Some users found this confusing and didn’t realize that they had to tap the menu icon to see the logout link. Now, these links remain on the page at all times. Also, since these links no longer move into the menu icon, we have moved the menu icon down to the menu bar. The menu icon will only appear when the page shrinks to the point where the menu can no longer fit on the page. As before, tapping the menu icon will open the menu.

Improved content view for iPads in portrait orientation

Prior to the interface update, course content on an iPad in portrait orientation could sometimes be confined to a small part of the screen. Course blocks (e.g., navigation) would still be present and force the main content area into a small space.


Now, after the update, the main course content area will now fill the entire page on iPads in portrait orientation, and any course blocks will move down below the main content area. This will permit important content, such as the Ilios course calendar, to occupy the entire width of the screen, making it much more useable.

We hope you like these changes. We will continue to improve the CLE interface based on feedback we receive. Please continue to let us know if you any ideas on how the CLE can be improved, either by completing the short CLE Refresh Survey, or contacting the Learning Technologies Group.

Categories: Convergence

Exploring the Archives for 150: UCSF’s Black Caucus

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2015-02-17 09:45

In preparation for UCSF’s 150th anniversary celebration exhibits, we’ve been doing a bit of exploring in the vaults. For the next several months, I’ll be posting some of the treasures we’ve discovered!

In honor of Black History Month, we’re highlighting UCSF’s Black Caucus, 1968-1982. The Black Caucus was formed at UCSF in May 1968, a month after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. As stated in the organization’s bylaws, the caucus was “a forum open to all black men and women on [UCSF’s] campus. Here they may openly express themselves regarding matters of race as they affect life on the campus and the community.”

Flyer for a Black Caucus event commemorating Martin Luther King, Jr., 1981. MSS 85-38, box 2, folder 45

The caucus engaged in a variety of civil rights initiatives and social justice projects. Members fought to increase minority student admissions, supported custodial and technical staff in labor disputes, and campaigned for more diverse hiring at all levels of the university. They shared personal stories, event updates, and project achievements in a newsletter named the Black Bulletin.

Draft of the cover of the June 1971 edition of the Black Bulletin, created by members of the Black Caucus. MSS 85-38, box 2, folder 41b

Notable UCSF figures helped found and lead the Black Caucus. For instance, UCSF Medal winner Joanne Lewis served as one of the organization’s first chairpersons and organized the publication of the Black Bulletin. Lewis became the first Affirmative Action Coordinator at UCSF and was later named Assistant Vice Chancellor for Capital Projects and Facilities Management. Lewis mentored students throughout her career and advocated for the advancement of women of color at UCSF.

Joanne Lewis

Black Caucus efforts supported a legacy of public service and community involvement at the university. For example, following the death of civil rights activist and UCSF pharmacology professor Dr. Thomas Burbridge in 1972, the caucus proposed that one of the Chancellor’s Public Service Awards be named in his honor. Chancellor Philip Lee approved the proposal and today the Burbridge Award recognizes university individuals whose activities promote social justice and enable equal access to education and employment.

A memorial to Dr. Thomas Burbridge on the back cover of the October 1972 edition of the Black Bulletin, created by members of the Black Caucus. MSS 85-38, carton 1, folder 41a

The passion and dedication of Black Caucus members helped shape UCSF’s commitment to diversity and equal opportunity. To learn more about the organization, register to see the Black Caucus records, MSS 85-38. You can also check out the papers of Dr. Thomas Burbridge, MSS 79-4.

Categories: Brought to Light

Fighting Measles

Brought to Light Blog - Fri, 2015-02-13 10:35

In recent weeks measles again became one of the main topics covered in the news stories. Not that long ago, before the advent of the vaccines, measles epidemics were a common occurrence around the globe. Back in the nineteenth century numerous hashika-e (measles pictures) from the UCSF Japanese Woodblock print collection served as guides to combat this disease. Many of them include a holly leaf (tarayō) believed to contain protective powers as well as recommendations for auspicious diet and and explanations how to persuade the measles kami (“Shinto term for god, divinity”*) to leave.

These charms when attached to a door or screen were supposed to protect the house and its inhabitants against measles:

Charm against measles. Utagawa Yoshitsuya, 1862.

Poetic charm against measles. Utagawa Yoshikatsu, 1862.

Another print depicts three “mighty men” conquering measles.

Three mighty men conquering measles. Ochia Yoshiiku, ca. 1870s.

And the battle to eradicate measles continues…

Modern day narrative on battle against measles. Unknown artist, ca. 1860.

Please visit the UCSF archives digital collection to view the remaining prints related to contagious diseases and read about their meaning.

*Japanese popular prints: from votive slips to playing cards. Rebecca Salter, 2006.

Categories: Brought to Light

Having Problems with RefWorks’ Write-n-Cite?

In Plain Sight - Mon, 2015-02-02 12:16

UCSF librarians have encountered several Mac RefWorks users having problems getting Write-n-Cite to work correctly on their laptops. Usually it’s associated with the Mavericks and Yosemite operating systems. These problems are often not reproducible, so it’s been difficult to pin down why it’s not working properly and what’s the fix.

If you’re a RefWorks user having problems using Write-n-Cite you can still format a bibliography using One-Line/Cite. View this short online tutorial to see how this method works:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternatively, you may want to switch to different software. Some of our students are switching to Zotero, which is free and relatively easy to learn.

Click here to learn more about Zotero.

Categories: In Plain Sight

2015 Tech Clinics at UCSF Library

Convergence - Wed, 2015-01-21 15:46

The Learning Technologies Group had a great time with the 2014 Tech Clinics and we were able to help with CLE and multimedia projects along the way! Here are a few examples of UCSF projects that faculty and staff brought to the Tech Clinics: CLE gradebook questions, Articulate module development, Media@UCSF integration in CLE courses, online exam review for finals and midterms, and we even helped support a UCSF podcast!

2015 is going to be even better and you can register for an upcoming Tech Clinic today! Tech Clinics are held at the UCSF Library, every second and forth Friday of the month, from 9am-4pm. We encourage people to register in advance, but drop-ins are welcome. Each Clinic offers short presentations and demos on popular topics throughout the day, as well as one-on-one support opportunities with Learning Technologies staff.

Here is what people are saying about the Tech Clinics:

The Tech Clinic is a valuable, convenient, and wonderful resource. All my tech questions were answered and I received a follow-up email with additional resources to help me with my project. I appreciate the knowledge of the staff and how quick we were able to cover things. I look forward to using the service again in the future and will refer others to this great service.”

– Robert Kirkbride | Event Production | Campus Life Services, Arts & Events

2015 Tech Clinic Topics include:
  • CLE Basics: This 90 minute training is offered on-demand at the start of every Tech Clinic. Have new staff or faculty using the CLE? This is the perfect opportunity to get them started on the right foot!
  • Integrate video in a CLE Course: Learn about new ways to incorporate video in your CLE course, including adding media assignments, creating Media Galleries, and using the screen recorder. Click to Register Now!
  • Get to know the Storyline Suite: We are thrilled to have Articulate Storyline available in the Tech Commons. Come see a demo of this powerful software and start your next UCSF project! Click to Register Now!
  • Online Exam and Gradebook: Have questions about CLE exams before, during, or after the semester? Need to fix a grading issue? The Tech Clinic is the place to get your questions answered! Click to Register Now!
  • CLE Course Design Tips: The CLE has changed (for the better)! Learn how to get the most out of these improvements and design courses for students using mobile devices. Click to Register Now!
  • Screencasting with Camtasia: Need to demonstrate how to use an application or website? Camtasia is a screencasting software used and supported in the Tech Commons’ eLearning Studio (CL-245). Camtasia is system agnostic (available on both the Mac and PC platforms).

2015 UCSF Library’s Tech Clinic Schedule (click the link for more information and to register):

Just a few reminders from last year’s Clinics:
  • Too busy to make it the UCSF Parnassus Library for a Clinic? Attend remotely using WebEx
  • Attend a CLE Roundtable to collaborate with other faculty and staff using the CLE (held from 12-1pm during every Clinic)
  • Film a faculty interview in the eLearning Studio during a Tech Clinic
  • Learn a new application using Lynda.com in the Tech Commons
  • Repeat! Return for another Clinic for follow-up questions and best practices for next semester

Have questions about the UCSF Library’s Tech Clinics? Contact the Learning Technologies Group today!

Image Credit:

Kemi Amin from the UCSF Library

Categories: Convergence
Syndicate content