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Finding Aids to the Eric L. Berne Papers now available on the Online Archive of California

Brought to Light Blog - 7 hours 9 min ago

Detailed finding aids for the six collections of Eric L. Berne Papers are now available for researchers to examine on the Online Archive of California. These collection guides provide an in-depth look at the work and writings of Eric L. Berne, M.D. (1910-1970), a San Francisco-based psychiatrist, UCSF lecturer, best-selling author, and father of the theory of Transactional Analysis (TA).

Each finding aid provides a full description of the collection, including dates, background information, scope and content, extent, type of materials, any access restrictions, and a complete box and folder list. The finding aids are all full-text searchable. They can be accessed through the UCSF Archives and Special Collections page or via the Online Archive of California. The following guides have been published:

Eric L. Berne Papers, 1939-1973, MSS 82-0

This accession primarily contains photographs and reel-to-reel audiotape recordings of lectures and meetings of the San Francisco Social Psychiatry Seminars, an organization founded by Berne.

Eric L. Berne Papers, 1931-1970, MSS 89-12

This accession contains a significant portion of correspondence, writings, records of the San Francisco Social Psychiatry Seminars (later the International Transactional Analysis Association), and military psychiatry records.

Eric L. Berne Papers, 1933-1971, MSS 2003-12

This accession primarily contains writings, notes and lectures.

Eric L. Berne Papers, 1929-1970, MSS 2005-08

This accession includes records of Berne’s medical school education, military service, and travels, as well as a significant amount of writings and audio recordings.

Eric L. Berne Papers, 1963-1970, MSS 2013-18

This accession contains 7 recorded lectures by Eric Berne and 44 audiocassettes from the International Transactional Analysis Association Tape Library.

Eric L. Berne Papers, 1904-2007, MSS 2013-19

This large accession includes early personal correspondence, diaries, travel ephemera, educational files, writings, photographs, and artifacts.

These collections are open for research and can be viewed in the UCSF Archives reading room. Please visit this page to make an appointment or contact an archivist: http://www.library.ucsf.edu/collections/archives/access

Digitization work on these collections is progressing quickly. Check back soon for updates on the Eric L. Berne Digital Collection!

Detailed processing and digitization for the Eric L. Berne Papers was made possible by generous support from 17 TA Associations worldwide and many individual donors through the International Transactional Analysis Association.

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UCSF Archives Lecture Series: Lessons at UCSF from the Early AIDS Epidemic, April 16, 2014

Brought to Light Blog - Fri, 2014-04-11 16:13

Join us on Wednesday, April 16th for a special program featuring prominent UCSF faculty. This is the second lecture in a series launched by UCSF Archives & Special Collections.

Learning from Our History: Lessons at UCSF from the Early AIDS Epidemic

UCSF played a leading role in the early response to the AIDS epidemic. UCSF faculty and staff helped create important models of care, made many key discoveries into the nature of the disease and its management, and faced the many emotional and ethical burdens at a time when personal safety could not be assured in patient care. This event will be less a lecture and more a conversation of those early days with four prominent UCSF faculty members, each of whom were present and active from the very first days of what would become a massive epidemic. They will offer their own perspectives on this history and engage with each other and the audience in this program.

Presenters: Drs. John Greenspan, Paul Volberding, Molly Cooke, Jay Levy (UCSF) Date: Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Time: 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm
Location: Lange Room, UCSF Library, 530 Parnassus, 5th floor

This lecture is free and open to the public. Information on how to sign up or donate to AIDS Walk San Francisco will be available before and after this event. AIDS Walk San Francisco benefits HIV/AIDS programs and services throughout the Bay Area, including some at UCSF.

About the UCSF Archives & Special Collections Lecture Series

UCSF Archives & Special Collections launched this lecture series to introduce a wider community to treasures and collections from its holdings, to provide an opportunity for researchers to discuss how they use this material, and to celebrate clinicians, scientists, and health care professionals who donated their papers to the archives.

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Artificial Eyes in the Artifacts Collection

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2014-04-08 09:25

Danz Collection of Artificial Eyes Depicting Diseases and Defects

Pictured above, one of the many beautiful and unusual artifacts in our collections, the Danz Collection of Artificial Eyes Depicting Diseases and Defects. It was donated to UCSF by a local Ophthalmology firm, G. Danz & Sons, Ophthalmic Prosthetics, San Francisco, CA. The date of the collection is unknown, however our best estimates place it pre-1950.

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Women’s History Month: The first female graduates of UCSF

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2014-03-25 13:40

March is Women’s History Month and, in keeping with the spirit, we’d like to honor a few of the trailblazing women in UCSF’s history.

Portrait of Lucy Field Wanzer

Lucy Field Wanzer became the first woman to graduate from UCSF, then officially known as the Medical Department of the University of California, in 1876. Lucy grew up in Wisconsin and cared for her mother who had tuberculosis during her childhood. This early and significant exposure to the field of medicine convinced Wanzer that she wanted to become a doctor. The family later moved to California, where Lucy fought for the right to realize her dream– her initial application to the University of California program was rejected based on gender. After a lengthy appeals process, she was accepted and the regents adopted a resolution stating that “young women offering themselves for admission and passing the required examination must be received to all the privileges of the Medical Department.”

Medical Department of the University of California, Class of 1876

At the time, a few medical schools on the East Coast had admitted and graduated female students, but none in the West. For the fifty years following Wanzer’s graduation, female students comprised approximately 10% of UCSF medical graduates in the midst of a 4% national average.

Much more has been written about Wanzer elsewhere. For more information, check out the History of UCSF website, this article by a current School of Medicine student, or this extensive paper by a UCSF School of Medicine alumnus.

Blue and Gold, 1890, page 33

 

The next woman to breakdown gender barriers in a UCSF school was Maria Angelina Burch who graduated from the College of Dentistry in 1883. Maria grew up in nearby Pescadero, CA. Burch passed away at the age of 27, just five years after receiving her dental degree. Her obituary, on right, published in the 1890 Blue and Gold, the annual for all of the University of California, refers to Burch as the Dental Department’s ambitious and intelligent “pioneer lady graduate.” Burch established a private practice in San Francisco in 1884 which prospered quickly. She was described as “fast climbing the hill to fame and fortune” at the time of her death.

 

The Graduate, 1912, page 60

Following closely on Burch’s heels was Josephine Eugenia Barbat in the College of Pharmacy class of 1884. Barbat was a native San Franciscan. University records in the 1890′s show that after graduation, Josephine became an instructor of Botany within the College of Pharmacy– no doubt one of the first women to teach the subject, as well. Not quite satisfied, Barbat went on to graduate from the College of Medicine in 1903. She’s listed in the 1904 Directory of Physicians and Surgeons as having a practice at 1310 Folsom St. The 1912 issue of The Graduate, the College of Pharmacy’s annual at the time, features a photograph of Josephine as the President of W.P.A.P.C. (the Women’s Pharmaceutical Association of the Pacific Coast).

The creation of the Training School for Nurses within the University of California in 1907 also served to up the number of women in the field of medicine. Two years later, the school produced its first graduate, Lillian Cohen, pictured below in the unique white mortarboard cap and square blue and gold pin.

Lillian Cohen, 1909

A three-year nursing degree was standard at the time in the Nursing program, and the following year the University of California graduated its first full class.

Training School for Nurses of the University of California, Class of 1910

Today, UCSF celebrates the diversity of its students, staff, and community in many different ways. In 2012, 54% of all incoming students were female. Do you have a favorite woman in UCSF history? Let us know!

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Fiat Lux: Ansel Adams images of UCSF

Brought to Light Blog - Thu, 2014-03-20 09:15

Published in 1967 Fiat Lux: The University of California is dedicated to “those who will make the future.” This book was commissioned by UC President Clark Kerr in the early 1960s. He invited photographer Ansel Adams and writer Nancy Newhall to not only commemorate the past and present of the University, but to project, as far as possible, “the next hundred years.” This was a challenging idea and the authors spent three years touring the nine campuses as well as scientific and agricultural experimental stations, meeting hundreds of people from chancellors to freshmen. Ansel Adams produced 605 fine prints and over 6,700 negatives for this centennial publication that is just 192 pages long and this endeavor almost rivals his body of work dedicated to Yosemite.
At the beginning of the book the authors profiled the campuses or as they were called by Clark Kerr, “Cities of Intellect” and they selected a beautiful panoramic image of the UCSF campus, as viewed from the Golden Gate Park. This photograph together with seven others was also used for the UCSF School of Medicine centennial celebration program in 1964.

University of California San Francisco Medical Center from the tower of De Young Museum, Golden Gate Park, August 1964

The authors of the volume witnessed rebuilding and expansion all around the University, including the UCSF campus where the old medical building that was photographed for the project was demolished in 1967.

Ansel Adams, Clock Tower of old Affiliated Colleges building, with new structures in fog, August 1964

Fiat Lux includes just 5 photographs of the UCSF campus, but there are dozens of others that can be found in the Ansel Adams Fiat Lux collection on the UCR/California Museum of Photography website.

If you would like to learn more about the book, please visit the Bancroft Library website created for the recent exhibit “Fiat Lux Redux: Ansel Adams and Clark Kerr” that featured 50 original photographs selected from Ansel Adams prints in Bancroft’s collection.
The book Fiat Lux: The University of California is available at the UCSF Library.

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UCSF’s 150th Anniversary

Brought to Light Blog - Thu, 2014-03-20 09:00

Earlier this year the UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellman, MD, MPH sent out a message to the campus community announcing key events that will be organized to mark the 150th anniversary of the founding of UC San Francisco. The UCSF’s sesquicentennial celebration will start this year with the Founders Day events in April and continue through May 2015. Additional details can be found on the website that was developed for the 150th anniversary.

UCSF Anniversary Logo

For the past several months the archives staff has been working on several projects that document and bring to life the rich history of UCSF. Our stories about these projects will be accompanied by the UCSF Anniversary Logo, and today we are publishing the first installment from these series.

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Historic Panoramic Photograph of San Francisco, circa 1933-1935

Brought to Light Blog - Fri, 2014-03-14 09:21

Use our slideshow below to view this beautiful panoramic photograph of San Francisco taken in the 1930s from the Parnassus campus of UCSF. The photograph is comprised of ten discrete photographs taped together to form an almost seamless panoramic image measuring 4.5″ x 54″ looking north and spanning west to east.

Click on a thumbnail to enlarge the images and see the slideshow.

Unfortunately, the photograph lacks accompanying information about its creation, however, several significant qualities have helped us to narrow down the date. Most significantly, in the second portion of the close-ups, on the right side, the unfinished Golden Gate Bridge is visible. The pylons closest to San Francisco can be seen, but not the suspension cables which, according to the Golden Gate Bridge Construction Timeline, puts the image somewhere in 1933-1935.

Other things of note include the presence of the original Kezar Stadium (former home of the SF 49ers and Oakland Raiders), the absence of the Bay Bridge (which was also under construction from 1933-1936), and the generally bare Presidio area.

What strikes you most about the photo? Let us know! We’d love to hear your insights into the old San Francisco landscape.

 

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New Additions to the Eric Berne Collections

Brought to Light Blog - Fri, 2014-03-07 13:12

The Eric L. Berne Collection grew by another 8.5 linear feet a few weeks ago, when additional records arrived at Special Collections. The International Transactional Analysis Association (ITAA) and the Berne family have generously placed a large collection of Eric Berne’s early papers and educational records on deposit with UCSF for public research and use. The ITAA has also donated a collection of audio recordings of Berne’s Transactional Analysis lectures and of San Francisco Social Psychiatry Seminar meetings (1963-1970). This new accession in particular documents Berne’s medical school education at McGill University in Montreal and his early career as a psychiatrist. It also includes more of his professional and creative writings in several languages, and contains fascinating ephemera from his frequent research trips around the world.

Berne’s ticket to travel in Turkey, 1938

Photograph page of Berne’s ticket to travel in Turkey, 1938

Three-dimensional objects are represented as well, such as an original version of the board game based on Berne’s bestselling book Games People Play.

This collection will be processed in the next several weeks and linked to other rich materials in the related Berne collections. Online finding aids to these materials are coming soon.

 

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UCSF Archives Acquires Laurie Garrett Papers

Brought to Light Blog - Fri, 2014-02-28 11:10

Laurie Garrett, Pulitzer Prize-winning science journalist and researcher, recently donated her papers to the UCSF Archives and Special Collections. Ms. Garrett is the only writer to have been awarded all three of the Big “Ps” of journalism: the Peabody, the Polk, and the Pulitzer.

Ms. Garrett is the best-selling author of The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance (1994) and Betrayal of Trust: The Collapse of Global Public Health (2000). Her latest book is I Heard the Sirens Scream: How Americans Responded to the 9/11 and Anthrax Attacks (2011). She graduated with honors in biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, attended graduate school in the Department of Bacteriology and Immunology at the University of California, Berkeley, and did laboratory research at Stanford University with Dr. Leonard Herzenberg. During her PhD studies, Ms. Garrett started reporting on science news at KPFA, a local radio station. This hobby soon became far more interesting than graduate school, and she took a leave of absence to explore journalism. In 1980, she joined National Public Radio, working out of the network’s bureaus in San Francisco and, later, Los Angeles as a science correspondent. In 1988, Ms. Garrett left NPR to join the science writing staff of Newsday. Her Newsday reporting has earned several awards: Award of Excellence from the National Association of Black Journalists (for “AIDS in Africa,” 1989), First Place from the Society of Silurians (for “Breast Cancer,” 1994), and the Bob Considine Award of the Overseas Press Club of America (for “AIDS in India,” 1995). Since 2004, Laurie Garrett has been a senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. Ms. Garrett was awarded doctorates Honoris Causa by three universities: Illinois Wesleyan University, the University of Massachusetts Lowell, and Georgetown University.

The Laurie Garrett papers consist predominantly of the research files used by Ms. Garrett in the writing of her two books, The Coming Plague and Betrayal of Trust. They contain numerous drafts and published newspaper and magazine articles, including her Pulitzer Prize-winning 1996 series printed in Newsday, chronicling the Ebola virus outbreak in Zaire. Also included are a series of 25 articles, “Crumbled Empire, Shattered Health,” on the AIDS epidemic and public health crisis in the former Soviet Union that received the George Polk Award for Foreign Reporting in 1997. This collection encompasses a wealth of primary resources consisting of correspondence, interviews, photographs, and ephemera, including HIV/AIDS-related posters from around the world. A sizable part of the collection includes research materials, interviews and notebooks (that will be transferred to the archives at a later date) from the time when Laurie Garrett was a science correspondent for NPR, Newsday, and wrote for the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times, among many other publications.

These papers also contain secondary source materials such as complete publishing runs of AIDS Weekly, AIDS Newsletter, and AIDS Treatment News, scholarly papers, conference abstracts, reports, and promotional materials.

This sizable collection consisting of more than 150 linear feet spans from the mid-1970s to 2013. It documents a broad array of subjects related to global health, newly emerging and re-emerging diseases –primarily the HIV/AIDS epidemic, SARS, avian flu, Ebola, Anthrax, and influenza – and their effects on foreign policy, national security, and bio-terrorism.

Laurie Garrett gave a lecture at Toland Hall on UCSF campus on February 21, 2014

The Laurie Garrett papers are a major acquisition for the UCSF archives and it will enhance several existing areas of collecting, in particular history of HIV/AIDS epidemic, infectious and chronic diseases, and global and public health. UCSF is considered one of the preeminent repositories of AIDS-related materials and Ms. Garrett’s collection complements papers from the AIDS History project that began in 1987 as a joint effort of historians, archivists, AIDS activists, health care providers, and others to secure historically significant resources about the response to the AIDS crisis in San Francisco. For more than thirty years since Ms. Garrett started covering the outbreak in San Francisco (even before it became publicly known that a virus was responsible), she has been collecting materials on the evolution of the HIV pandemic. Her vast and comprehensive files contain information on many topics including the social origins and history of HIV/AIDS; HIV drugs; President Reagan’s and Clinton’s AIDS policies as well as detailed HIV/AIDS information on many different countries. Her extensive writings and files on the subject of public health mesh well with the materials from the Philip Randolph Lee and Harold S. Luft papers already preserved in the UCSF archives.

The availability of these materials for research will help advance the study and teaching of the health sciences, and allow further analysis of how medical discoveries were presented and described to a broader audience. The papers of Ms. Garrett, a gifted and internationally recognized author and investigative reporter, will serve as a source of inspiration for novice and experienced medical and science writers and journalists.

The Laurie Garrett papers were officially unveiled during the special presentation she gave at UCSF on February 21, 2014.

For more information, or if you have questions on how to access this collection, please contact Polina Ilieva: polina.ilieva@ucsf.edu.

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DASHM adopts Jacob Bigelow’s American Medical Botany

Brought to Light Blog - Wed, 2014-02-26 11:25

We’re pleased to announce that two of our books have been adopted!

The UCSF Department of Anthropology, History, & Social Medicine has chosen to conserve American Medical Botany. Read more about the book from the perspective of Sarah Robertson, a PhD student in the department.

Additionally, the always supportive Bay Area History of Medicine Society has graciously taken De humani corporis fabrica libri septem under its wing.

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UCSF Archives Lecture Series presents Laurie Garrett, February 21, 2014

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2014-02-18 11:01

Join us on Friday, February 21st as Laurie Garrett, Pulitzer Prize-winning science journalist and researcher, gives a special presentation at UCSF. This is the inaugural lecture in a new series from UCSF Archives & Special Collections.

Lecture: Tracking Disease, Forecasting Futures
Presenter: Laurie Garrett, Senior Fellow for Global Health, Council on Foreign Relations
Date: Friday, February 21, 2014
Time: 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Location: Toland Hall Auditorium (U142), University Hall, 533 Parnassus, 1st floor
This lecture is free and open to the public.

Laurie Garrett

About Laurie Garrett
As a medical and science writer for Newsday in New York City, Laurie Garrett became the only writer ever to have been awarded all three of the Big “Ps” of journalism: The Peabody, The Polk (twice), and The Pulitzer. Laurie is also the best-selling author of The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance and Betrayal of Trust: The Collapse of Global Public Health. In March 2004, Laurie took the position of Senior Fellow for Global Health at the Council on Foreign Relations. She is an expert on global health with a particular focus on newly emerging and re-emerging diseases; public health and their effects on foreign policy and national security. Learn more.

About the UCSF Archives & Special Collections Lecture Series
UCSF Archives & Special Collections launched this lecture series to introduce a wider community to treasures and collections from its holdings, to provide an opportunity for researchers to discuss how they use this material, and to celebrate clinicians, scientists, and health care professionals who donated their papers to the archives.

The second lecture “Remembering the first years of AIDS epidemic” is scheduled for Wednesday, April 16th  from 12 pm-1 pm at the Lange room in the Library and will feature Drs. Volberding, Cooke, Greenspan, Abrams.

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UCSF on Historypin

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2014-02-11 09:56

Historypin is a website that allows users to view and post historical photos that have been digitally “pinned” to a map– thereby highlighting the location which may be unrecognizable in the photo. It allows photographs to be searched by place, time, or channel– channels are accounts that have been set up by various people and organizations.

We created our channel on Historypin– UCSF Archives & Special Collections– in part to begin celebrating the 150th anniversary of UCSF! Toland Medical College began in 1864 in the heart of San Francisco’s North Beach neighborhood, moved to the wide-open countryside of the Parnassus/Inner Sunset area, and has continued to change and grow.

We will continue to add images and information throughout the coming year. Check back often for new and interesting images of the ever-evolving UCSF campus. We encourage you to add comments or information to our pinned images!

One of the niftiest features of Historypin is the ability to pin an image directly onto street view. If the photograph was taken from the street (or similar angle and location), it can be placed on the map over the Google street view image of the image’s location– just like the image of Market Street Earthquake Damage, 1906 shown below. You can toggle the fade slide bar to play with photograph’s opaqueness.

For more detailed information on the history of UCSF, please see A History of UCSF.

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Adopt-a-Book: Help Us Restore and Preserve 150 Rare Books

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2014-01-28 16:22

UCSF’s Rare Book Collection contains more than 15,000 volumes, including items from the 15th century, collected over the past 150 years through donations and gifts from faculty, alumni, and friends of the Library. Over time, many books have deteriorated so that additional use would add further damage to their condition. As a busy research library, it is important that we keep these materials accessible to present and future researchers.

A conservator at the UC Berkeley Library conservation lab.

In honor of UCSF’s 150th Anniversary, UCSF Archives & Special Collections has launched the Adopt-a-Book program, which aims to fund the restoration of 150 books that were published before 1864, the year that UCSF was founded. Your generous donations will support the work of conservators that will stabilize the books and prevent future damage, in addition to paper restoration, cleaning, and some cosmetic treatment.

Bartolomeo Eustachi; Bernardi Siegfried Albini, Explicatio tabularum anatomicarum, 1744. One of the books that is featured on the Adopt-a-Book website.

The Library is very grateful to the members of the Bay Area History of Medicine Society, who have already donated money to restore a copy of De Humani Corporis Fabrica, 2nd edition (1555), written by Andreas Vesalius.

Interested in adopting a book from this exceptional collection? Learn more about the Adopt-a-Book program. We sincerely appreciate your generosity and continued support!

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Medical History at UCSF: the Department of the History of Health Sciences, 1927-1998

Brought to Light Blog - Thu, 2014-01-23 10:15

The Archives and Special Collections contain both administrative and teaching files from the Department of the History of Health Sciences, especially between the years 1985-1998, before it became a Program in the interdisciplinary Department of Anthropology, History and Social Sciences. The unit was originally created in 1927, but became official on January 1, 1930 as Department of Medical History and Bibliography, supplied with a special seminar and rare book room in the new library. Fueled by the Oslerian cultural ideal, the medical classics were read and quoted since many educated physicians still could read Latin fluently. Chairing these seminars was Le Roy Crummer, a notable bibliophile and veteran collector of old books, together with Dean Langley Porter and professors Herbert Evans and Chauncey Leake. These activities were meant to convey to UC Regents that the campus provided a cultural environment that would preclude the removal of the Medical School to the Berkeley campus.

During the 1930s and 1940s, the Department flourished under the leadership of John B. de C. M. Saunders, a Professor of Anatomy and University Librarian. During these decades, its stewardship of archival materials and historical collections expanded, particularly with the acquisition of a collection of Oriental medicine titles. The name of the unit changed to History of Health Sciences in 1965 to accurately reflect the interests of the entire campus, and Dr. Saunders was appointed Regents Professor of Medical History, a post he occupied until his retirement in 1973. His long tenure featured the development of a graduate program of studies leading to an M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. His successor, Gert H. Brieger, then guided the Department from 1975 to 1984, when another change in name occurred to better illustrate its humanistic mission: History and Philosophy of Health Sciences.

Poster for the 1994 public lecture series at UCSF entitled “From House of Mercy to Biomedical Showcase: A Retrospective of Hospital Life.”

My appointment in 1985 allowed a resumption of the graduate program and the development of new elective courses for medical students, all supported by a library and audiovisual collection. With bioethics rapidly becoming an independent field, the designation History of Health Sciences returned. By this time, moreover, medical history was no longer the medicine’s inspirational handmaiden of its early days, but a scholarly enterprise designed to carefully reconstruct the medical past within its scientific, social, political, economic and cultural contexts. Such an outward glance, however, was complemented with an inward look at medicine itself, particularly the emotional demands of becoming and being a healer and establishing relationships with patients.

To implement such goals, the Department sponsored a program of noon-hour illustrated lectures, delivered at the Parnassus campus and open to faculty, students and staff during the 1990s. Among the most prominent themes presented with the use of slides and films were a history of the Western hospital from antiquity to AIDS and another of alternative healing traditions. In my opinion at the time, the old-fashioned lecture format was still the best way to convey the complex and contingent panorama of medicine’s impact on society. For medical students, our elective tutorials were designed to allow a guided exploration of the process of becoming a physician—emotional and technical– with the help of historical examples.

During more than half a century of its existence, many scholars played prominent roles in the Department’s development. Among them were faculty, students, health professionals, visiting lecturers and guest speakers, as well as patrons and donors who provided resources for the unit to flourish, allowing it to remain at the forefront of similar academic medico-historical institutions in the country and the world.

Guenter B. Risse MD, PhD is a historian of health and medicine. He was the chair of the Department of the History of Health Sciences at UCSF in 1985–2001. He now is Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, History and Social Medicine at UCSF. His most recent book “Plague, Fear and Politics in San Francisco’s Chinatown”  was published in 2012 by Johns Hopkins University Press; it depicts the work of UCSF faculty during the epidemic.

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Eric Berne Rare Book Inventory Completed

Brought to Light Blog - Tue, 2014-01-21 10:00

The Eric L. Berne collection includes over 300 rare books from Berne’s personal library. Published between 1829 and 1984, these volumes illustrate Berne’s study of medicine, psychology, philosophy, folklore, and therapeutic techniques, as well as his published work. The researcher will find medical textbooks from Berne’s student days at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, practical manuals from psychiatric clinics and hospitals, popular “self-help” books of the 1950s and 1960s, and weighty tomes on psychoanalysis by major thinkers like Freud, Erikson, and Federn. Many books are underlined and annotated in Berne’s handwriting.

Cover of Berne’s medical school textbook “The Autonomic Functions and the Personality” by Dr. Edward J. Kempf, 1921

Berne’s annotations in “The Autonomic Functions and the Personality”

The collection also includes copies of Berne’s published works. His 1964 best-seller Games People Play was translated into nearly twenty different languages, and the Italian, German, Danish, Finnish, Swedish, Hebrew, Chinese, Norwegian, and Dutch editions are represented on the shelves. Working copies and first editions of The Mind in Action, A Layman’s Guide to Psychiatry and Psychoanalysis, The Structure and Dynamics of Organizations and Groups, Principles of Group Therapy, Transactional Analysis in Psychotherapy: A Systematic Individual and Social Psychiatry, and What Do You Say After You Say Hello? are available, as well as works by other contemporary and later practitioners of Transactional Analysis.

Cover of Dutch edition of Games People Play (Mens erger je niet)

The rare book collection will soon be searchable through the UCSF Library catalog, and is available to researchers in the Archives and Special Collections Reading Room.

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Nursing students in the 1920s: Clara & Vivian Edmonston

Brought to Light Blog - Wed, 2014-01-15 15:35

Clara Edmonston and Vivian Coats met as nursing students at UCSF in the 1920s. We have small collections from both women– MSS 2011-14 Vivian Coats (Edmonston) papers and MSS 2013-9 Clara Edmonston papers. The collections are full of insights into the lives of the two women in nursing school and as working nurses in the 1920s. Much of the collections is correspondence and documentation of their work, allowing the reader to hear Clara and Vivian’s voices and get to know them a bit.

Clara Edmonston, 1924.

Vivian Coats (Edmonston), 1923.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I recently had the opportunity to chat with Dr. Frances Edmonston, daughter of Vivian and niece of Clara, and she elaborated on their stories. Clara and Vivian were friends in nursing school and Clara had the idea to introduce Vivian (nee Coats) to her brother, Charles Edmonston. The match was a success– Vivian and Charles later married. Vivian finished her BS in Nursing in 1923, Clara in 1924. Vivian later went on to graduate in 1927 with a certificate in Public Health Nursing and continued to work in public health-related nursing roles in the Bay Area.

Vivian took care to save items that she felt represented her nursing career. She saved notes, newspaper clippings, official forms, correspondence, reports, and other memorabilia.

Vivian’s notes for making Poison Oak Lotion.

Vivian’s notes on the incubation period of infectious diseases.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

She worked in a number of nursing capacities to help underserved populations. In 1929 Vivian was employed by the Red Cross in Willows, CA  to provide Itinerant Nurse Service. Newspaper clippings collected by Vivian document the work that she accomplished and positive effect she had on the town.

In an April 30, 1929 report to the Red Cross on her work’s progress, Vivian wrote that “in the Willows Grammar School [she] examined 555 children and found 876 defects. These defects included faulty vision, carious teeth, throat abnormalities, skin eruptions, enlarged lymph nodes or glands in the necks, and those more than 10% underweight or 20% overweight.” Furthermore, she goes on to say that she “visited 19 rural schools examining a total of 392 children and found 837 abnormalities. Notice the greater number of defects in proportion to the number of children. If statistics are of any value as an indicator and guide, they surely point to the rural districts as needing prevention and correction of defects and health education.” A number of students were found to be in need of tonsillectomies and candidly she says, “I know many of the teachers will be relieved, next Fall, to see fewer mouth breathers and more nose breathers.”

Page 1 of newspaper clippings from Willows from February 16-May 1, 1929.

Vivian is very clear about the services that must be improved in the schools and the communities to have a positive impact on the health of the residents. Her recommendations include follow-up home visits, new outhouses at schools, bacteriological examination of drinking water, and updated health and anatomy curriculum in schools.

During my conversation with Frances she called my attention to the work Vivian did with vaccinations, which serves to illuminate some of the larger public issues of the early 20th century. For one position Vivian was loaned a model T Ford and hired to investigate cases of diphtheria. In the event that the presence of the disease was confirmed, Vivian had to put a quarantine sign on door of the home. Other duties included vaccinating children for diphtheria and small pox in the San Leandro area– which, it seems, were controversial among the parents. Vivian saved many of the notes from parents concerning the vaccinations.

Page 1 of a letter from a parent to the school teacher concerning vaccinations, circa 1934.

Page 2 of the letter from a parent to the school teacher concerning vaccinations, circa 1934.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A close-up of the portion of the letter discussing the diphtheria vaccination, circa 1934.

This History of Vaccines timeline provides a bit of context for Vivian’s work. Around 1922, many schools began requiring the students to be vaccinated for smallpox before they could attend. Similarly new diphtheria immunizations were introduced in the 1920s (and are credited with virtually wiping the disease out of the United States). Furthermore, it notes that in 1926 opposition to mandatory vaccinations was growing among the public. The same argument is echoing in many communities today.

Page of parents requesting that their children not be vaccinated at school, 1933-1934.

Categories: Brought to Light

New year, new collections!

Brought to Light Blog - Thu, 2014-01-09 16:14

We’re very pleased anytime we’re able to bring new collections out of dark corners and, you guessed it, into the light. The following newly cataloged collections cover a breadth of topics including tobacco control, AIDS history, nursing school in the 1920s, inventing the pap smear, surgery in the 19th century, and UCSF history:

  • MSS 2013-4 Grande Vista Sanatorium collection, 1922-1938: Collection includes various medical mailings that Dr. Hendrik Belgum, the founder of the sanatorium, received. The sanatorium was founded in 1914 in Richmond, CA where some of its ruins can still be found in the Wildcat Canyon Regional Park.
  • MSS 2013-9 Clara Edmonston papers, 1921-1924: Papers include Clara’s correspondence while she was a UCSF nursing student in the 1920s. Our holdings also include the papers of Clara’s friend, future sister-in-law, and co-nursing student: MSS 2011-14 Vivian Coats (Edmonston) papers, 1921-1935.
  • MSS 2012-30 Dr. George N. Papanicolaou collection, 1945-1990:  Research material put together by Dr. Robert Liner for a film documenting the story of the Pap smear development by Dr. George N. Papanicolaou. Dr. Liner was not able to produce the film. It includes two boxes with papers, photographs, and publications as well as a box of six audio cassettes with interviews of Mrs. Mary Papanicolaou, Mrs. Trout, Dr. Joseph Hinsey, and Constantine Railey.
  • MSS 2012-27 Carolyn B. Martin papers, 1988-2004:  Document Martin’s involvement with California tobacco control. She was a Lung Association volunteer and helped to lead the state campaign for Prop. 99 in 1988 and served as the first chairperson of the state advisory committee on program and expenditures. Martin participated in the negotiations for the implementation legislation for the proposition, numerous other tobacco related bills and lawsuits, and education efforts.
  • MSS 98-60 Villagomez manuscript, circa 19th century: A handwritten, unpublished manuscript in Spanish concerning surgery techniques from the 19th century.
  • AR 2013-08 UCSF School of Nursing – Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner Program records, 1991-1995: Documents the grant application for the UCSF School of Nursing Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner program.
  • MSS 96-32 Brooks Linton ephemera collection, 1983-1995: AIDS-related ephemera collected by Brooks Linton, a former San Francisco General Hospital AIDS Ward nurse, from approximately 1983-1995. Items include newspaper clippings, brochures, reports, magazine articles, announcements, and others.
  •  AR 2012-25 UCSF Division of Gastroenterology lab records, 1968-2012Collection contains electronic data files, spectrophotometer recordings, and gastroscopy records books that were kept by Dr. McDonagh in his lab. Other materials include, floppy disks, zip disks, CDs, DVDs, slides, and hard drives. Dr. McDonagh was a professor and researcher at UCSF from 1971-2012.
  • AR 2012-26 UCSF Medical Center Quality Improvement Department records, 1989-1999: Collection includes materials on the projects, reports, and initiatives of the Quality Improvement Department. The department aims to develop data-driven strategies to improve care and to lead the field by disseminating their experiences locally and nationally.

If these, or any, of our materials strike your fancy and you’d like a closer look, please head to our homepage and click on the calendar to the right to schedule an appointment. If you have any questions don’t hesitate to contact us!

Other additions in the latter part of 2013 included:

Categories: Brought to Light
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