In Plain Sight

EndNote Update X7.2 Provides More Features for Collaboration

In Plain Sight - Thu, 2014-11-13 12:13

EndNote has released it’s latest update, X7.2. The major new feature is the ability to use an EndNote online account to share a library with up to 14 collaborators. You’re also given unlimited online storage so you can store and share as many files as you need.

On opening EndNote X7 you’ll be prompted to update to X7.2.

With X7.2 you can:

  • share a library with anyone who’s using EndNote X7 (with up to 14 people)
  • sync attachments, notes, and annotations in real-time for collaboration
  • share your entire EndNote library, including references, PDFs, and annotations
  • share just groups
  • add to, annotate and use the library – at the same time as others

For more information:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: In Plain Sight

Using Zotero for Collaboration

In Plain Sight - Thu, 2014-10-23 13:54

Zotero is a free, easy-to-use application to help you collect, organize, cite, and share your research sources. In our experience one of its strengths is the option to create shared libraries, known as Groups, allowing you to collaborate with other Zotero users. The ease with which Groups can be set up facilitates a wide range of collaborative activities.

Zotero was originally developed as a FireFox extension but a recently introduced  “standalone” version allows you to use it with other browsers. With the local component on your computer you can add citations and bibliographies to Word documents.

To use Zotero groups you must also create an online account at Zotero.org.  Zotero’s online syncing allows you to access your Zotero library on any computer with internet access and Zotero installed.  The two components are then kept synchronized.  Zotero Groups offer users the option to create shared libraries and collaborate with other Zotero users.

To create a group login to your online account and select Groups:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Give your group a name. Note that you can choose who has access to it:

Click here for more information on using Zotero Groups.

Categories: In Plain Sight

Using RefWorks for Collaboration: RefShare

In Plain Sight - Thu, 2014-09-18 14:28

RefShare is a special feature of RefWorks that allows you to share information in your RefWorks account with others. It’s accessed from the Organize & Share Folder tab:

RefShare allows you to share your RefWorks database of just specific folders, or subfolders, from your RefWorks database with other RefWorks users at UCSF and in some cases even publicly.

RefShare users have the ability to allow exporting, printing, generating a list of references and even using custom output styles at the folder or database level. Existing RefWorks users can export from a shared database or folder directly into their own RefWorks database.

There is also a “comment” feature, so you can even attach comments to the various records.

RefShare is ideal for classes and group projects, or researchers working together from remote locations. Users can subscribe to RSS feeds of particular RefShare folders or create bibliographies in a variety of citation styles from the citations in RefShare.

You can also post your folders or databases on a shared page viewable by all RefWorks users within UCSF:

For more information view this online tutorial.

 

 

Categories: In Plain Sight

Using EndNote for Collaboration: EndNote Basic (aka EndNote Web)

In Plain Sight - Mon, 2014-09-08 11:04

A previous post outlined a simple way to share references using EndNote’s “traveling library” features. However, EndNote Basic (previously known as EndNote Web) offers more sophisticate features for sharing references with colleagues.

Just to remind you, there are now two versions of EndNote, desktop EndNote and Endnote Basic.  The latter is a separate application from the desktop version. It’s free, and was formerly known as Endnote Web. EndNote Basic is essentially a web-based stripped down version providing users with the ability to store 50,000 references, 2GB of file storage, 21 bibliographic styles, 5 online search connectors, and 9 import filters.

With EndNote Basic it is possible to create groups which you can share with others.  Groups can be created on the basis of either read or read/write.

  1. Select the Organize tab from the top of the screen, and then click on Manage My Groups:
  2. You’ll notice there is a column with options for sharing. Check the box next to Share and then click the Manage Sharing button:
  3. Groups can be shared with anyone that has an EndNote Basic account.  You can allow people to view your citations, or you can allow them full access to the group using the Read & Write option.  Be aware that if you allow someone Read & Write access, they can add, delete, and modify the citations in that group. You can modify or turn off sharing at any time. 
  4. When the other person logs in they’ll see the shared groups:

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this short online tutorial to learn more.

Note however that whilst references can be shared within a group, PDF attachments cannot be shared due to licensing restrictions.

 

Categories: In Plain Sight

Using EndNote for Collaboration: the Traveling Library

In Plain Sight - Wed, 2014-09-03 12:23

A Traveling Library refers to the formatted citations in your Word document and is created for each Word document when formatted using EndNote and Cite-While-You-Write (CWYW):  it’s a subset of your EndNote library which contains only the citations that appear in your paper. Each time you format a citation (e.g. insert a reference) EndNote will look in your open library to find the corresponding reference. If the library is not available or not open, EndNote uses the “traveling library” for reference information. This allows you to collaborate with other authors on a paper without each author having the same EndNote library because reference data is kept with each formatted citation. The reference data saved with each citation includes all fields except Notes, Abstract, and Figure.

When someone e-mails you a MS Word document that has been created with EndNote citations you can export the “traveling library” from Word into a new or existing EndNote library on your own computer by following these steps:

  • Have the Word document open and go to the EndNote tab (in Word 2007 +).
  • In the most right column, click on “Export to EndNote.”


 

 

 

  • Choose “Export Traveling Library”. Follow the directions. You’ll be guided to add those references into either an existing EndNote library (by selecting a library from the drop-down list or using Browse to locate the library) or a new EndNote library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note that this will only work if the Word document citations were created using EndNote, and the EndNote coding still remains in the document (i.e. it wasn’t converted to a plain text document before you received it).

Categories: In Plain Sight

When Will EndNote X8 be Released?

In Plain Sight - Mon, 2014-08-11 11:31

Some of us dread the arrival of summer because that’s when the EndNote folks usually announce the release of a new version of the software and we have to start thinking about whether or not it’s worth upgrading (and if you have it installed on multiple workstations  in a teaching lab, where are you going to get the money?). As September approaches I was wondering what was the delay with X8. According to a post I found on Facebook there will be no new update this year.  You can read EndNote’s explanation here:

 

 

 

 

 

 

My thanks to Pedro from Brazil!

If you’ve working with version X7 you might want to upgrade to X7.1, for free. There are some enhancements to syncing between the desktop and online versions, so you might want to check this out. Details here. Download here.

 

 

Categories: In Plain Sight

Using Mendeley for Collaboration

In Plain Sight - Thu, 2014-07-31 12:31

A new generation of citation/reference management applications are making it easier to share references and text with colleagues. This is the first of a series of posts looking at some of the most popular ones.

Of all current reference managers Mendeley probably stands out as a collaboration tool for researchers. Mendeley is a desktop and web program for managing and sharing research papers and discovering research data. Its social networking features facilitates collaboration among researchers through the creation of groups which allow you to collaborate with any member of the Mendeley community. In private groups, you may share and annotate a list of documents within your PDF organizer, allowing you to collaboratively tag and annotate research papers. In public groups, you may create a reading list with your colleagues and make it accessible to anyone on the web. Groups now also have an activity feed on Mendeley Web and in Mendeley Desktop, helping you stay up to date on new additions and discussions within the group.

View this short online tutorial explaining how to utilize Mendeley groups for collaboration:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: In Plain Sight
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